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Aside from packing your patience and a heavy tolerance for Paw Patrol, you’ll need to make sure you’ve got her parents’ permission and the documentation to prove it.

Rosie DiMartino, a travel agent with Polo Travel Ltd in Concord, Ont., directs families to the Canadian government website, which has an interactive form that will help them generate a letter that they can then take to be notarized.

DiMartino, who has specialized in family travel for more than 15 years, says that letter should be notarized and specifically outline who you are, the dates of the trip, and your relationship to the child.

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It will cost you. A quick search found that notary publics charge anywhere from $20 to $100 for the service and will require official documents for all parties before giving support. their rubber stamp of approval.

It’s not just extended relatives that need to keep a letter handy. Even if you are a parent travelling solo with your child, the letter is required.

And whatever the travelling adult’s relationship to the child, it is never enough to have just one parent sign off.

“If the parents are separated or divorced [the ability to have the child travel without both parents’ consent] would be dependent on their agreement with one another and legally,” DiMartino says. “If one parent has sole custody of the child and does not require permission from the other then naturally they would not require it when sending their child alone to travel”

Still, she adds, if both parents are not travelling or signing, it would be advisable to attach a copy of any custody papers demonstrating sole custody or a copy of the death certificate, if the other parent is deceased.

Relatives should also remember that there are other inherent risks to this type of travel. Just having a ticket and your letter won’t guarantee your admission to another country with the minor in tow. “You should also review the entry and exit requirements for the country which you are visiting,” DiMartino says. This information can be found by calling or visiting the embassy or consulate of the country you intend to travel to.

Another tip: Make sure you have a full understanding of the child’s medical history and have any necessary medications or instructions with you. Pre-existing medical conditions or allergies should never be a surprise. And you’ll want to make sure the carriers and hotels you’re using are made aware, if necessary.

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And in all seriousness, boning up on your preschool entertainment options is a good idea. Downloading shows she knows to a device she can use, having familiar snacks on hand for the flight and rehearsing what she can expect in the foreign destination are ideal prep for the journey ahead. Knowing their swim level is important, for example, if there’s a pool in your plans.

Need some travel advice or have a question about life on the road? Send your questions to personalconcierge@globeandmail.com.

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