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Undated handout photo for travel story. Courtesy of CAMPagne au Clos Sainte-Thècle

Courtesy of CAMPagne au Clos Sainte-Thècle

Kitoki Inn, Bowen Island, B.C.

An hour from downtown Vancouver, but a world away is this serene new property that embraces Japanese traditions in architecture and wellness. Three cedar-clad guest cabins, minimally designed and adorned with touches from local makers, offer a reclusive hideaway amid Bowen Island’s temperate rainforest. The star of the property is the open-air Japanese onsen, which is exclusive to guests. Sitting on a secluded bluff, you can soak in the hot tub while also soaking in the views.

Opens July 15. Stays from $225/night through kitoki-inn.com.

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Bear Hill Lodge, Jasper, Alta.

Bear Hill Lodge offers everything you’d want from a rustic cabin in the woods, but with the convenience of being in the heart of Jasper. The property boasts luxurious studio cottages, chalets and, most recently, a log house that can sleep up to seven. This year, the main lodge received a makeover and a new accessible guest room. Cabins are equipped with a fireplace and guests can order dinner prepared by a local chef directly to their door.

Stays from $280/night through bearhilllodge.com.

Camp Wolf Willow, Sask.

Next to Wolf Willow winery and overlooking the South Saskatchewan River, this campsite offers multiple glamping opportunities. Large luxury tents that sleep four or new tent-shaped wooden cabins that sleep two come equipped with a fire pit and grill. It’s easy to access biking and hiking trails, water sports on the river and mazes through lilac fields. Starting in August, Mistry Trail Rides will offer horseback riding experiences for guests.

Campsites from $45/night, furnished accommodation from $99/night through campwolfwillow.com.

Inn at Grand Pré Winery, Grand Pré, N.S.

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In the Annapolis Valley on the oldest farm winery in the province, Domaine de Grand Pré is opening a former private residence as a six-room inn this year. Exploring the wine region and visiting nearby Wolfville may be at the top of your to-do list but there’s plenty to experience on site, especially viewing the Grand Pré dykeland, a UNESCO World Heritage site. The winery’s staff can also arrange for a chef’s table experience for groups of eight to 10.

Stays from $195/night through grandprewines.com.

Campagne au Clos Sainte-Thècle, Sainte-Thècle, Que.

Campagne au Clos Saint-Thècle, which opened in February, is made up of three four-season domes, each of which sleeps two. Situated on the edge of the forest in Mauricie, there’s easy access to Clos Saint-Thècle vineyard and stand-up paddleboarding on Croche Lake. A Finnish sauna and cedar hot tub are available for guests and, thanks to nature-friendlier minimal outdoor lighting, stargazing is a must in the evening.

Stays from $269/night through clossaintethecle.com.

Shanty Stay, Souris, P.E.I.

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Providing a cottage feel, seaside location and the amenities of a small town – restaurants, cafés, artisanal shops – Shanty Stay’s 10 colourful wooden cabins are each equipped with a double bed, ensuite bathroom and a private deck where you can soak in the ocean air. With an onsite bike shed and gear, cyclists can easily peddle to the waterfront or connect to the Confederation Trail.

Stays from $80/night through shantystay.com.

Bumblebee Bight Inn and Brewery, Pilley’s Island, N.L.

Come for the signature brews and wood-fired pizza, stay because the views from this cove are idyllic – and because the brewery opened its five-suite inn in December. Bumblebee Bight’s owners source local berries for the brewery’s crafted sours and work with neighbouring farms and fisheries on its restaurant menu. The private tearoom upstairs is perfect for unwinding and each suite comes with a cozy stone fireplace for days when the weather isn’t co-operating.

Stays from $200/night through bumblebeebight.ca.

Frontenac Club, Kingston

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The Frontenac Club reopened last summer after a 21-month restoration. The 175-year-old building was once the home of the Kingston branch of the Bank of Montreal and original brick and limestone details remain in the 20 guest rooms. Enjoy cinq à sept on the rooftop patio before settling into dinner at the onsite restaurant, The Bank Gastrobar. An on-staff historian gives tours of the property and there are wine and whisky tastings in the old vault.

Stays from $349/night through frontenacclub.com.

Black Spruce Hotel, Whitehorse

Less than a 10-minute drive from downtown, this contemporary “landscape hotel” was designed to blend into its surroundings. Using the Japanese wood preservation technique, sugi-ban, the Yukon spruce siding on the four cabins was burned to give the wood a durable finish. Each unit comes with its own kitchenette and a forthcoming communal wood-fired oven will be lit up for Friday pizza nights. Also coming this summer: a 24-hour sauna for those long summer days when the sun doesn’t seem to set.

Stays from $200/night through yukonblackspruce.ca.

Up-to-date details on travel restrictions are available through canada.ca. For more coronavirus information, visit theglobeandmail.com/canada/the-zero-canada-project/.

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