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The Four Seasons Megève, the first hotel in the Alps to offer 'bed and helicopter' packages.

Richard Waite/Four Seasons Megève

The Four Seasons Megève, which will celebrate its one-year anniversary in December, is a hotel of firsts.

It was the first Four Seasons property to open in the European mountains, specifically in the iconic French ski village of Megève. It was the first hotel in the Alps to offer “bed and helicopter” packages and heli-ski safaris, allowing guests to chase the best conditions in nearby resorts such as Val Thorens, Courchevel and Chamonix (all just a 30-minute flight away). And, this winter, it will offer France’s first electric snowmobile tours, sunrise tours in mountain-ready Polaris cars and a snow-cat experience – all of which are heavily entwined with hot chocolate, pastries, fondues and untouched snow.

The exquisite 55-room escape – also the first hotel in the resort to offer direct access to the slopes – is a collaboration between the Four Seasons group and the Rothschild family, who initiated the development of Megève as a ski destination almost 100 years ago.

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Ariane de Rothschild worked closely with architect Bruno Legrand on the project and was heavily involved in the interior design.

Richard Waite/Four Seasons Megève

Located just an hour’s drive from Geneva airport, Megève has long been regarded as one of Europe’s top ski centres. Charming and picturesque, its wooded ski runs surround a medieval centre, plus more modern attractions such as designer boutiques and gourmet restaurants. Since the resort’s inception in 1920, properties in the village have been carefully fashioned from the traditional wood and grey slate and stone of France’s Tarentaise Valley. The Four Seasons is no exception.

Inside, the five-star property offers impeccable service and North American room sizes (often hard to come by in Europe). The Four Seasons Megève isn’t just carrying the Rothschild name: Baroness Ariane de Rothschild worked closely with architect Bruno Legrand on the project and was heavily involved in the interior design. Some of the Baroness’s own personal art collection – and souvenirs from her world travels – grace the walls and gardens, including a three-metre-high Wang Keping piece that stands opposite the entrance.

The hotel's 900-square-metre spa is the largest in the Alps.

Richard Waite/Four Seasons Megève

One standout feature is the biggest spa in the Alps: a 900-square-metre wellness space complete with six treatment rooms, pool, sauna and hammam. Dining options include lunch at the two-Michelin-star Le 1920, a contemporary French restaurant under chef Julien Gatillon (who oversees the entire culinary ethos) and dinner of exquisite sushi at Kaito. And for families, amenities include babysitting options, a Teen Centre equipped with a home theatre, PlayStation, computers and games, and a Kids for All Seasons activity program.

If skiing and cold-weather trips aren’t your thing, fret not: The Four Seasons Megève was designed to be a year-round resort. The 18-hole Mont d’Arbois golf course is right next door, and some 12,000 plants have been carefully planted in the gardens for guests to enjoy during warmer months. And chocolate, cheese and pastries are available no matter the season.

The hotel offers North American room sizes – hard to come by in Europe.

Richard Waite/Four Seasons Megève

Rooms from €850 ($1,280) a night; fourseasons.com/megeve.

The writer stayed as a guest of the hotel. It did not review or approve this article.

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