Skip to main content
//empty //empty

The LAGO display in Venice's Rialto Market.

Italian furniture company LAGO has chosen an unusual place to display its wares - a lived-in apartment near Venice's Rialto Market. Think of it as a cross between an episode of Big Brother and a romp through IKEA. Three resident designers have outfitted their entire home with LAGO furniture to create an inspirational living space/showroom that is open around the clock. Simply ring the doorbell and you'll be invited in for a tour and maybe even an espresso. Browsers beware: This isn't simply a fun open house. The designers are tasked to meet certain sales targets, so you may face a hard-core pitch. This is the second Appartamento LAGO in Europe; the project made its debut in Milan and more locations are slated for London, Bologna and Turin. 205 Sestiere San Polo, Venice. venezia.appartamentolago.com

A FORTRESS OF LUXURY

Cap Rocat is the type of military compound you'd want to be holed up in for a while. This newly opened opulent hotel was once a 19th-century fortress on a secluded peninsula in Majorca, Spain, and pampers its guests with privacy and amenities that are fit for royalty. Its 24 guest rooms are strategically positioned along the ramparts where guns were once stationed, resulting in unobstructed sea views. Each room has a terrace with an outdoor canopied bed, where breakfast is served upon request. A guests-only beach means that you don't have to share sand, sea and snorkels with the rowdy crowds of Palma. And the old gunpowder depot has been transformed into a dimly lit, private event space called the Bunker. Take note of the atmospheric design elements: bullets are used as door handles and gun carriages double for coffee tables. www.caprocat.com

Story continues below advertisement



WAY OF THE ROSES: FROM PUB TO PUB

Pedal across northern England on the Way of the Roses, a new 270-kilometre coast-to-coast cycling track that runs from Morecambe Bay in Lancashire to Bridlington Bay in Yorkshire. With scenery that has been plucked from a Jane Austen novel, the route passes through quaint country villages, past historic cathedrals and the rolling landscape of Yorkshire Dales National Park. There are plenty of rustic pubs and charming tea shops along the way for refreshment. The route will be unveiled on Sept. 11 to mark the 15th-anniversary celebrations of the National Cycle Network. To buy a Way of the Roses route map (available at the end of August for £6.99) and for more information go online. www.sustrans.org.uk

AN OFFER AL PACINO COULDN'T REFUSE

Al Pacino is Broadway-bound. After an eight-week run in The Merchant of Venice at Central Park's Delacorte Theater, the Academy- and Tony-award-winning actor is taking his portrayal of Shylock to 44th Street. This is a momentous occasion for New York theatre. It has been 20 years since The Merchant of Venice has played on Broadway (Dustin Hoffman was Shylock at the 46th Street Theatre back in 1990) and Pacino himself hasn't graced a Broadway stage since 2003. The play runs for 78 performances only, from Oct. 19 to Jan. 9 at the Broadhurst Theater (235 W. 44th St.) www.broadhursttheater.net



Special to The Globe and Mail

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies