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Five places to spoil your kids this summer

Move over Harry and Meghan, the real royalty is coming to town

The Gleneagles Hotel in Scotland has plenty of activities to keep your kids entertained.

Kids these days: Phones they can keep in their pockets, all the music they can dream of at their fingertips and no idea how to work the Dewey decimal system. The life they live doesn't come close to that of their parents and grandparents.

But who can blame today's kids, with their hipster vibes and #lit conversations, if they feel as if they deserve the finer things? They didn't give themselves all those participation awards, now did they? Looking for a way to spoil your precious genius this summer? Here are a few to get you started.

The Gleneagles Hotel, Perthshire, Scotland

The Gleneagles Hotel’s motto is ‘whatever an adult can do, a child can do, too.’

You know what's hard? Trying to make your way into your indoor tree house while also keeping an eye on the toy campfire and menagerie of chairs designed to resemble wildlife. Still, a kid has to do what a kid has to do. And at the new "Little Glen" space that's to have as much fun as they can in a space grown-ups will envy. Older kids get "The Den" where linked rooms have PS4s, Xboxes, arts and crafts, pool and air hockey tables, and board games. The hotel's family motto: "Whatever an adult can do, a child can do, too," means your little one can spend days driving a mini Land Rover, learning the ins and outs of falconry or racing ferrets … as one does. gleneagles.com

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Martinhal Resort, Cascais, Portugal

Is there anything that says relaxing quite like looking up from your massage to see your seven-year old on the table next to you? It's one of the options at Martinhal Resorts in Cascais, Portugal. The family-friendly luxury property invites kids into every facet of the property including the business centre (set next to an indoor playground) and, yup, the spa. martinhal.com

Hotel de Russie, Rome

Rome is a fantastic choice for families. Locals love the bambinos and families are welcome in most restaurants and activities. It's an easy pick for parents looking to expose the wee ones to culture and history without forcing them to read a book about culture and history. At the Hotel de Russie, kids are promised they'll be "just as pampered as the grown-ups" through the "Families R Forte" program. Along with stuffed toy turn down service, the hotel offers a fresco painting class for children. Have more of a Brutus than a Picasso? Sign them up for gladiator school, where kids dress up and learn the ancient art of battle from local specialists. roccofortehotels.com/hotels-and-resorts/hotel-de-russie

Hard Rock Hotel, Orlando, Fla.

You've always known your kid was a star, now they'll have the suite to match. The new "Future Rock Star" suites at the Hard Rock Hotel at Universal Studios puts them centre stage right in their own bedroom. Each suite has a stage set-up complete with liquid flooring, spotlights and a twinkling starlight bed canopy. There's an item in each suite that once belonged to a superstar to set the mood, and when they need you, you're just a "stage door" away in the connecting room. universalorlando.com/hardrock

Bernardus Lodge & Spa, Carmel Valley, Calif.

All that fresh air and sunshine in California wine country can be exhausting for kids. Give them a break at Bernardus Lodge, where they can slip on a kid-sized robe, find a spot in front of the fireplace and settle in for a movie. Not sure what to watch or what to nibble? Call on the movie butler, who can offer you a selection of local artisan pizzas to choose from, as well as top off your buttered popcorn, sweet treat and beverage needs. At the cost of US$90 for a family of four, expect the equivalent of white-glove service even when your butler is only offering a selection of the finest gummy worms. bernarduslodge.com

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