Skip to main content

A drive through the park takes you past oceans of iridescent black rock. It's a little eerie but the sci-fi landscape will take your breath away

1 of 7

Clambering over the sheet (or pahoehoe) lava is half the fun of exploring the dark landscape.

Catherine Dawson March/The Globe and Mail/Catherine Dawson March/The Globe and Mail

2 of 7

Inside the Jaggar Museum at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Warren Costa of Native Hawaii Guide explains the creation myth of the islands.

Catherine Dawson March/The Globe and Mail/Catherine Dawson March/The Globe and Mail

3 of 7

Continual eruptions in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park can make roads impassable.

Catherine Dawson March/The Globe and Mail/Catherine Dawson March/The Globe and Mail

4 of 7

The Ohia tree is the first plant to grow in the cracks of hardened lava.

Catherine Dawson March/The Globe and Mail/Catherine Dawson March/The Globe and Mail

Story continues below advertisement

5 of 7

The Ohelo berry bush, a plant sacred to Pele the volcano goddess, grows amid the cinder and dead wood of an old eruption.

Catherine Dawson March/The Globe and Mail/Catherine Dawson March/The Globe and Mail

6 of 7

The swirls and puddles of hardend lava create a bleak landscape but, hundreds of years later, it will be covered by lush tropical growth.

Catherine Dawson March/The Globe and Mail/Catherine Dawson March/The Globe and Mail

7 of 7

Lava from Kilauea Volcano meets the sea on Hawaii Island.

Hawaii Tourism

Report an error