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Finally, a chance to sleep in a Ping Pong paddle

A computer-generated image of the hotel in the shape of a ping-pong racket.Huainan, a coal-mining city in China, hopes to catch the world's attention with an Olympic Park filled with bizarre-shaped buildings. On the drawing board are a hotel designed in the shape of a ping pong bat, a main stadium shaped like an American football, a volleyball-shaped indoor swimming pool and smaller sports facilities shaped like a soccer ball and a basketball. The buildings were designed by architect Mei Jikui, renowned for sports-related constructions. Completion is slated for late 2016.

Zhang anhao - Imaginechina

A roundup of the latest travel news from around the world.



China's wacky new sports park

Huainan, a coal-mining city in China, hopes to catch the world's attention with an Olympic Park filled with bizarre-shaped buildings. On the drawing board are a hotel designed in the shape of a Ping-Pong paddle, a main stadium shaped like an American football, a volleyball-shaped indoor swimming pool and smaller sports facilities shaped like a soccer ball and a basketball. The buildings were designed by architect Mei Jikui, renowned for sports-related constructions. Completion is slated for late 2016.

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Europe's first women-only hotel floor

Europe is catching up with the world. Copenhagen's Hotel Bella Sky Comwell, opening next month, claims to offer that continent's first floor for women only. A survey of Danish women produced a very specific wish list. Respondents said a room is more hygienic if the last guest was a woman. They also wanted security; a bathtub; an emergency kit with lip gloss, eyeshadow and mascara; organic food; and a lounge with green tea, caffe latte and fresh orange juice.

Stone-carving contest for novices

If you've ever wanted to hone your skills in the medieval art of stone carving, you'll get your chance on April 23. A stone-carving contest for novices will be held at the Ozark Medieval Fortress in Lead Hill, Ark. The fortress is an authentic Middle Ages castle being built using 13th-century methods under the supervision of French and American historians. Construction is expected to take 20 years. The site is open to the public. Information: ozarkmedievalfortress.com.

Sources: Visit Copenhagen, Ozark Medieval Fortress, Travel Daily News

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