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Tour the world's largest bat colony - at night

Twenty million bats emerge from Bracken Cave in Bracken, Texas.

Eric Gay/Eric Gay/AP

Holy bat cave

As the sun sets, bats emerge from the cave in search of insects, forming a cloud so dense it shows up on airport radar. Bracken Cave near San Antonio, Texas, is home each April through October to one of the world's largest colony of bats. Now for the first time, the public watch the nightly show at the cave with Bracken Bat Flight tours, which have been designed to dispel negative myths that generate fears and threaten bats, according to sponsor Bat Conservation International. Information: brackenbatflight.com.

Under the influence

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Is too much carousing causing you grief in Las Vegas? Now you can call the Hangover Heaven bus. Launched by anesthesiologist James Burke, the new service promises to pick you up on request and cure your hangover in 45 minutes. The $90 (U.S.) Redemption package uses intravenous hydration. For $150, the Salvation package adds anti-nausea and anti-inflammatory medications to the IV mix. According to the website, the treatment allows clients to continue the party or get back to their normal selves. For more information: hangoverheaven.com.

Child-free flight

Kids will be kids, but not on the upper deck of Malaysia Airlines' Kuala Lumpur-to-London A380 flights. Beginning July 1, the carrier is designating that section a kid-free zone. Families with children under 12 will be accommodated in the economy cabin on the lower deck. Little ones may still occasionally make it to the upper level, but only on days when family groups have completely filled the main section. The move comes less than a year after the airline banned babies from first class.

Sources: Bracken Bat Flight, Hangover Heaven, CNN

Douglas McArthur Special to The Globe and Mail

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