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Crowsnest Pass, a mountainous stretch of Alberta that manages to be both scenic and decrepit, is key to Jim Prentice’s self-styled image. Mr. Prentice plays up the seven summers he laboured in the area’s coal mines, getting dirty and working hard just like you.

Belle Peterson has her wedding dress adjusted before getting a photo taken at the Back To God Chapel in Bellevue Crowsnest Pass after getting married to Kris Peterson in a small afternoon ceremony. The couple, who are expecting triplets, plan to move to the area to live and work.Todd Korol/The Globe and Mail

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"I don't know anything about politics and I don't care,” says Val Salpak who is in the midst of selling her original 1956 Ford Thunderbird Blairmore in the Crowsnest Pass, Alberta.Todd Korol/The Globe and Mail

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The small main drag of the mining town of Coleman in the Crowsnest Pass. Alberta Premier Jim Prentice worked in the mines for seven summers while going to university in the area.Todd Korol/The Globe and Mail

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A heritage building stands empty and streets are almost deserted in the coal mining town of Coleman in the Crowsnest Pass.Todd Korol/The Globe and Mail

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Adam Emblau (L) jokes he is "one of two liberals in Alberta" while sitting in the sun outside of the Grand Union Hotel. Emblau says he is tired of politicians and what they have to say.Todd Korol/The Globe and Mail

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Lois Timms laughs with her friends at the Best of Alberta dining spot, the Cinnamon Bear coffee shop at Coleman in the Crowsnest Pass. Timms a bus driver for the coal mines, is still uncertain of who she will vote for in the next provincial election.Todd Korol/The Globe and Mail

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An old deserted mining shaft in the Crowsnest Pass.Todd Korol/The Globe and Mail

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A limber pine estimated to be several hundred years old sits at the gateway to the Crowsnest Pass, Alberta.Todd Korol/The Globe and Mail

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