Skip to main content

He picked up his camera the way a doctor takes his stethoscope out of his bag, a friend of the photographer once said. David Seymour had a knack for setting his subjects at ease.

As part of an ongoing series on conflict photographers this gallery features the work of David Seymour, a co-founder of photography co-operative Magnum. Working under the name Chim, this photojournalist documented the fringes of war, where he found haunted children and broken people struggling to rebuild.

Read 'Capturing an emotion with empathy' on one of David Seymour's most celebrated photographs.

Tereszka, a child in a residence for disturbed children. When asked to draw a picture of “home”, she scribbled these tangled lines on the blackboard. Warsaw, Poland., 1948. From CHIM’s UNICEF reportage “Children of Europe”. (David Seymour (CHIM)/Magnum)

Children take refuge in underground shelters on the Island of Minorca, Spain to escape the bombings in 1938. (David Seymour (CHIM)/Magnum)

Battle of the Ebro river (July 25th to August 3rd, 1938), Spanish Civil War. ( ©David Seymour / Magnum Photos)

Wounded in the Egyptian General Hospital, in Port Said. 1956. (David Seymour (CHIM)/Magnum)

Child and nun at Villa Savoia, a home for crippled children formerly organized by King Umberto and run by Catholic nuns. It had nearly 100 inmates, maimed by war or accidents from playing with surplus ammunition. Rome, Italy, 1948. From CHIM’s UNICEF reportage “Children of Europe”. (David Seymour (CHIM)/Magnum)

Art critic Bernhardt Berenson looking at a marble sculpture of Pauline Borghese by Antonio Canova. Villa Borghese, Rome, Italy, 1955. (©David Seymour / Magnum Photos)

A girl, raped during the war, in the Albergo dei Poveri reformatory. Female inmates were taught embroidery by Catholic nuns. Naples, Italy, 1948. From CHIM’s UNICEF reportage “Children of Europe”, 1948. (David Seymour (CHIM)/Magnum)

Egyptians in the wreckage of Port Said after the Franco British air attack in1956. (David Seymour (CHIM)/Magnum)

Schoolchildren leaving their secondary school, which survived, on the edge of the completely demolished Jewish Ghetto. The church still standing in the background is St Augustine church on Nowolipki, the very street where CHIM used to live and where his father worked at “Central” publishing house. Warsaw, Poland, 1948. From CHIM’s UNICEF reportage “Children of Europe”. (David Seymour (CHIM)/Magnum)

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.