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Alberta Finance Minister Joe Ceci says the province will implement the benefit next summer, because it ‘wanted to ensure that it came out when it was needed.’

TOPHER SEGUIN/THE CANADIAN PRESS

Alberta is bringing in two benefits to give more money to low-income families.

The new Alberta Child Benefit and enhanced Alberta Family Employment Tax Credit will impact families earning less than $41,220 per year, including those receiving Assured Income for the Severely Handicapped and social assistance.

The maximum annual benefit is $1,100 for families with one child, and up to $2,750 for families with four or more children.

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The maximum annual tax credit is $754 for families with one child, and up to $1,987 for families with four children or more.

"No child should grow up in poverty. Every child in Alberta deserves the chance to take part in their communities and reach their full potential," said Human Services Minister Irfan Sabir.

"It is simply unacceptable that in a province as prosperous as ours that many hardworking Albertans struggle to make ends meet."

Both benefits will be sent out to parents starting in July 2016 and the child benefit will be sent out in four payments, while the tax credit will be sent out twice a year.

To be eligible, families must be residents of Alberta, file a tax return and have one or more children under 18.

Finance Minister Joe Ceci said it made sense to implement the benefit next summer instead of right away.

"There was the view that we could do it best if we took some time," Ceci said.

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"We wanted to ensure that it came out when it was needed. It's needed right across this province but we could get it organized and deliver it best."

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