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About 31 per cent of the province’s MLAs have either crossed the floor or will not run in the next election, with a dozen more announcements to come.

For The Globe and Mail/Amber Bracken

Movers will shift a substantial amount of furniture around Alberta's legislature before the chamber reconvenes for a short session in early March after several defections and resignations.

While the near extinction of the Wildrose Official Opposition will be the most visible change, some high-profile MLAs also will not be running again, among them Doug Horner, Fred Horne and Doug Griffiths.

27: MLAs who will not run again or will run for a different party in the next election (so far)

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Although Alberta's fixed election-date law requires a vote in 2016, a snap election is expected this spring. So far, 31 per cent of Alberta's legislators have either crossed the floor or will not run in the next election, and more than a dozen MLAs have yet to announce their plans. Turnover runs between 15 and 30 per cent in most Alberta elections.

11: Wildrose defectors

On Dec. 17, leader Danielle Smith led eight of her fellow opposition MLAs across the floor and joined the Tories. The Wildrose Nine, as the group became known, were preceded a month earlier by MLAs Kerry Towle and Ian Donovan, who also became PCs. Ms. Smith said she left the party she had led for five years because members blocked her attempts to make it socially progressive.

15: MLAs who are not Tories

Premier Jim Prentice faces a small opposition split between three parties and one independent. The official opposition, Wildrose, is led by an interim leader who will not run in the next election. Matching Wildrose's five seats are the Alberta Liberals, whose leader has stepped down. Only two incumbents will run again. The Alberta NDP, currently the third opposition party, could vault to the opposition leader's office after the election.

70: Sitting PC MLAs

Despite pundits writing off Alberta's governing party as recently as a year ago, the PCs now have one of the largest caucuses in their recent history. Bolstered by defections, Mr. Prentice said before Christmas that he held a majority not seen in a decade. While the party may face challenges in Calgary and Edmonton, it is expected to pick up more seats in the rural south.

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1971: The year Alberta's Progressive Conservative Party won power for the first time

After 44 years without losing an election, the Tories are Canada's longest-serving provincial party. Times have changed. In 1971, young Albertans raced around in Plymouth Dusters, All in the Family was a new hit on CBS, Apollo 14 was on the moon, and Jean Béliveau played his last game in the NHL after winning the Stanley Cup for the Montreal Canadiens.

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