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Leave your gas guzzler in the garage and hit the streets for Car Free Vancouver Day, a citywide community festival that swaps traffic for street parties.

On Commercial Drive, take in roller disco, savour a free slice of pie at the OccuPIE Camp, watch a vintage fashion show, visit the Wishing Wellness garden of healing, take the wee ones to the Kidzone and dance along to all-day live bands and DJs.

On Main Street, check out live music at Neptoon Records, Red Cat, the Anza Club and Cottage Bistro; play a game of shinny; join the Community Police Kids Bike Rodeo; try activities from square dancing to tai chi; and stroll through a model village that includes chickens, bees, bikes, green building technology and homemade lemonade.

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"It's really laid back and calm, but has a really positive vibe, and a good pulse going on at the same time," says board chair Maddy Kipling. "Especially in post-riot Vancouver, it's a reminder that people can come together in a big party atmosphere and there is no chaos. People are really stoked and positive, and nobody brings their attitude in."

Car Free events are also happening along Denman Street in the West End and at community block parties in Kits.

All of the festivities are free, there are no corporate sponsors, and all of the staff and performers are volunteers.

"We aren't doing this for money, we are not doing this for exposure," Ms. Kipling says. "It's 100 per cent because we want an awesome, rad community that's safe and where people interact and celebrate."

Car Free Vancouver Day is happening in communities around Vancouver on Sunday. For locations and a complete schedule, visit carfreevancouver.org.

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