Skip to main content

Dr. Andrew Weaver, a climatologist from the University of Victoria, has announced he will run for the Green Party in the next provincial election.

Handout

Prominent climate scientist Andrew Weaver has announced he is seeking the nomination for the B.C. Green Party in a Victoria-area riding in the May 2013 provincial election.

Mr. Weaver, Canada research chair in climate modelling and analysis at the University of Victoria, is trying to become the MLA for Oak Bay-Gordon Head, now held by Ida Chong, the Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation.

Ms. Chong has been the riding's MLA since 1996. In the 2009 election, she won with 46.6 per cent over her NDP rival, who had 44.4 per cent. The Greens came third with 8.9 per cent.

Story continues below advertisement

The news is a boost for the provincial Greens, who have no members in the B.C. legislature and have lately had a low profile, with about nine per cent support in recent polls.

Victoria-born Mr. Weaver, a member of the Nobel-Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, said in a statement on Thursday that he hoped his candidacy would build some momentum for the Greens.

"By running for the Green Party in the Oak Bay-Gordon Head riding, I have decided to do something I never thought I would do. But with a rudderless provincial government and the potential for a landslide NDP victory in the upcoming election, I felt now was the time to get engaged to ensure that the principles of economic, social and environmental sustainability continue to be raised and discussed in the legislative assembly."

Green Leader Jane Sterk said she expected Mr. Weaver would be the first of several high-profile candidates for the party, but did not provide any additional details.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter