Skip to main content
Complete Olympic Games coverage at your fingertips
Your inside track on the Olympic Games
Enjoy unlimited digital access
$1.99
per week for 24 weeks
Complete Olympic Games coverage at your fingertips
Your inside track onthe Olympics Games
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
// //

A Trail, B.C., woman was attacked in her living room and left with minor injuries over the weekend by an older cougar that was desperate for food. The incident comes less than two weeks after a young, malnourished cougar injured a young boy near Port Alberni on Vancouver Island.

"[Young and older cougars] have difficulty accessing natural prey and then will look at targeting non-natural prey," said Mike Baldry, a wildlife conflicts prevention co-ordinator, adding that "pets, livestock or sometimes even people" can be victimized.

On Saturday evening, Angie Prime was sitting on her couch at home in Trail, surrounded by her three dogs, when she was shocked to see a pair of strange, big eyes staring at her from the dark kitchen. They belonged to a wild cougar, she said, which started slinking towards her.

Story continues below advertisement

"[The cougar] jumped up at me," said Ms. Prime. "I just kind of put a leg up and put my arms up in front of my face. … I screamed as loud as I could."

One of her dogs chased the intruder outside. But Ms. Prime had already suffered three puncture wounds on her thigh from the cougar's claws. Conservation officers tracked and killed the animal Monday morning.

"It was in pretty poor shape," said Sergeant Rob Hawton from the Trail & Greater District RCMP. He said the at least 10-year-old cougar was emaciated, weak and had worn-down teeth. "It just wasn't capable of hunting in a normal manner. So, it was desperate."

It is extremely rare for cougars to be in that condition, said Sgt. Hawton.

Less than two weeks prior, a young, malnourished cougar pounced on a seven-year-old boy during a family camping trip near Sproat Lake on Vancouver Island. Doctors treated the boy for puncture wounds and scratches to his head and shoulder.

Conservation officers also killed that cougar and a necropsy confirmed it was malnourished.

Cougar attacks in the province are very rare and usually do not exceed two per year, said Mr. Baldry, the wildlife conflicts prevention co-ordinator. But when they do occur, he said, it is normal for young cougars struggling to stake out their hunting territory and sick or injured older cougars to succumb to hunger and try and prey on people.

Story continues below advertisement

He said B.C. residents should always take precautions to deter cougar encounters. Never feed wildlife at home, he said, and manage garbage so that it does not attract cougars' prey like raccoons.

"If you live in B.C., you pretty much live in cougar country," he said.

With a report from The Canadian Press

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies