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Tseshaht Nation near Port Alberni, B.C.

A First Nation near Port Alberni, B.C., expects to evacuate some homes as heavy rains cause rivers to flood.

Tseshaht Nation emergency preparedness co-ordinator Hugh Braker said the community has been sand bagging riverside properties and roads, but with up to 120 millimetres of rain expected by Wednesday, the risk for flooding remains high.

Out buildings including garages and carports were damaged by flooding on the weekend, but no homes have been affected yet, Mr. Braker said. Six families who were forced to leave their homes on the weekend as a precaution were able to return, but a new round of evacuations is anticipated to begin Monday evening.

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Mr. Braker said the reserve's major thoroughfare, Highway 4, is also expected to be washed out by rising water levels, posing challenges for emergency crews as they try to reach people.

"Our reserve is serviced by the fire department of the City of Port Alberni. If we have a fire above the flooded highway, it's going to take a very long time for the trucks to respond."

Although a school on the reserve is not within the flood plane, Mr. Braker said classes might be cancelled to prevent students from having to travel on flooded roads. He said flood levels from the Somass River are expected to peak Tuesday and could be comparable to historic flooding that devastated the community in 2014. The reserve has faced flood risks every year since then.

"It's very unusual for us," he said about flooding three years in a row. "Certainly it's something the ... Tseshaht First Nation council will have to look at after this emergency is over."

The Tseshaht Nation declared a state of emergency on Friday and has been working with the province and Environment Canada to monitor the flood and take precautions.

"We've been able to do a lot of preventative planning and placement of resources in anticipation of the flood."

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