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Kayla Bourque as seen in Corrections handout photos.

B.C. Ministry of Justice, Corrections Branch

B.C. Corrections released a warning Monday about a "high-risk" violent offender who has been released from prison and plans on living in Vancouver.

Kayla Bourque, 23, is a former Simon Fraser University student who pleaded guilty last fall to "causing unnecessary pain and suffering to an animal, killing or injuring an animal, and possessing a weapon for a dangerous purpose," the notification reads.

Ms. Bourque was arrested in March after revealing to a fellow student that she disembowelled and dismembered cats in her hometown of Prince George and fantasized about murdering someone.

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After her arrest, police found a bag containing a knife, razor blade, syringe, mask, garbage bags and zap straps in her SFU residence room. They also found a video of her torturing her cat and eviscerating her family's dog.

Under the terms of her release, Ms. Bourque will be monitored by authorities and must abide by 46 court-ordered conditions, including a daily curfew between 6 p.m. and 6 a.m., avoiding contact with persons under 18 and places where they may be present, and refraining from using computers or Internet-enabled devices. She is also prohibited from owning or coming in contact with animals.

Ms. Bourque is five-foot-four and 130 lbs. with black hair and brown eyes. She is considered high-risk to reoffend.

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