Skip to main content

For a craft that relies on the dead, taxidermy is thriving surprisingly well, even in this age of instant, multidimensional imaging.

LaVerne Holmes sits among his work at his shop in Mill Bay, B.C. Mr. Holmes has been a taxidermist for over 25 years.Chad Hipolito/The Globe and Mail

1 of 7

Terry Woodworth, who spent 25 years in the infantry division of the Canadian army, now runs Lagoon Taxidermy in Colwood on Vancouver Island, and his skill at restoring a life-like appearance to long dead wildlife is in high demand.Chad Hipolito/The Globe and Mail

2 of 7

Scott Barley uses an air brush to add detail around a bear’s nose.Chad Hipolito/The Globe and Mail

3 of 7

Glass eyes are collected to be used for birds, mammals and some reptiles.Chad Hipolito/The Globe and Mail

4 of 7

In the end, the California quail ends up in the lynx's mouth as part of the overall piece.Chad Hipolito/The Globe and Mail

5 of 7

A Russian brown bear destined for a museum in Chemainus, B.C., looks over Terry as he stretches out a hyena hide.Chad Hipolito/The Globe and Mail

6 of 7

LaVerne Holmes, left, and Terry Woodworth have nearly 50 years of taxidermy experience between them.Chad Hipolito/The Globe and Mail

7 of 7