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In pictures: A small-scale look at LNG in B.C.

Mt. Hayes Natural Gas Storage Facility near Nanaimo offers a peek at the process that could go big in northern B.C.

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It takes about 200 days to fill a massive freezer at the Mt. Hayes storage facility, but the tank can hold 1.5 billion cubic feet of liquefied natural gas. The Mt. Hayes Natural Gas Storage Facility in Mt. Hayes, B.C., on April 2, 2013.

CHAD HIPOLITO/The Globe and Mail

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FortisBC Aboriginal relations manager, Carol Greaves, and LNG operations manager Brian Neary at the Mt. Hayes Natural Gas Storage Facility in Mt. Hayes, B.C., on April 2, 2013.

CHAD HIPOLITO/The Globe and Mail

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The 12-storey LNG storage tank. A rolled steel and double-walled, perlite-insulated cryogenic tank that can keep 1.5 billion cubic feet of natural gas in compressed liquid form, chilled to -160 degrees celsius is connected to a maze of pipes used for processing liquid natural gas at the Mt. Hayes Natural Gas Storage Facility in Mt. Hayes, B.C., on April 2, 2013.

CHAD HIPOLITO/The Globe and Mail

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FortisBC Aboriginal relations manager,Carol Greaves, looks at the water in a pond beside the Mt. Hayes Natural Gas Storage Facility in Mt. Hayes, B.C. Carol took part in removing over 125 northwestern salamanders for ten days into containers before hydrostatically testing the LNG storage tank took place. After returning the salamanders back to the pond, several birds and mammals have been spotted at the pond.

CHAD HIPOLITO/The Globe and Mail

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FortisBC LNG plant operator Miles Hensel records pressure and temperature readings in the control room at the Mt. Hayes Natural Gas Storage Facility in Mt. Hayes, B.C., on April 2, 2013.

CHAD HIPOLITO/The Globe and Mail

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