Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism.
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); } //

Each major B.C. LNG project would require hundreds of temporary foreign workers for specific tasks such as assembling massive components for a terminal. But the goal to fill most of the job vacancies within Canada is threatened by shortages of skilled labour.

Robin Rowland/The Canadian Press

Job cuts due to the slump in oil prices have opened the door for energy companies to recruit workers for proposed British Columbia terminals that would export liquefied natural gas, says Canada's Natural Resources Minister.

Greg Rickford met this week with officials from LNG Canada and Pacific NorthWest LNG, two of the front-runners in the race to build the massive ventures. He also met with TransCanada Corp., which has been lined up to construct the pipelines for those two projects. The LNG terminals will need thousands of construction workers if they forge ahead.

There has been a wave of layoffs in Alberta as crude-oil prices languish below $50 (U.S.) a barrel, with thousands of employees losing their jobs.

Story continues below advertisement

Each major B.C. LNG project would require hundreds of temporary foreign workers for specific tasks such as assembling massive components for a terminal. But the goal to fill most of the job vacancies within Canada is threatened by shortages of skilled labour.

The cabinet minister agreed with LNG proponents that matching suitable workers with job openings will be one of the top priorities in British Columbia's fledgling LNG sector. "It was brought obviously to our collective attention that some of the downturns in the oil sector have created opportunities to solve labour shortages, that is, there are pools to draw from right now," Mr. Rickford said Tuesday.

While LNG prices in Asia have tumbled, he said prospective customers in countries such as China and Japan look favourably on Canada's stable economic and political climate to secure long-term supplies of natural gas in liquid form.

"This is a long-term opportunity," Mr. Rickford said. "We've got to mobilize and ensure we have the labour supply, the infrastructure."

He made the comments at a news conference after delivering a speech to the Vancouver Board of Trade, touting Canada's energy potential, including prospects for exporting B.C. LNG in tankers to buyers in Asia.

Mr. Rickford said Prime Minister Stephen Harper's February announcement of tax relief for LNG projects will help spur the backers to invest in British Columbia.

Industry experts say only three or four of the 19 B.C. LNG proposals will become reality due to fierce global competition.

Story continues below advertisement

Neil Beveridge, an analyst with Sanford C. Bernstein & Co., said in a research report in January that three major Canadian LNG projects could potentially come to fruition. Mr. Beveridge listed the Royal Dutch Shell-led LNG Canada project as a candidate to start production in Kitimat in 2021. He also speculated that the Chevron Corp.-led Kitimat LNG venture has the potential to launch in 2023, while Pacific NorthWest LNG, led by Malaysia's state-owned Petronas, could begin production near Prince Rupert in 2024.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow the author of this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies