Skip to main content

A ship receives its' load of oil from the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Expansion Project's Westeridge loading dock in Burnaby, British Columbia, on June 4, 2015.JONATHAN HAYWARD/The Canadian Press

Federal Liberal government will make clear its support of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion when it meets with the newly elected government of B.C., the country's natural resources minister said Thursday.

But Jim Carr said it first must be established who won the election on Monday. The results appear to hand Liberal Leader Christy Clark a minority government, but this could change with counts of absentee ballots and recounts.

A total of 43 members of Clark's party were elected, one seat short of a majority.

The NDP won 41 seats and the Green Party three. Both have said they oppose the Trans Mountain expansion and, if they act together, could potentially try to derail it.

At an event in Calgary, Carr says the pipeline received conditional federal approval after "very rigorous review" and he continues to believe it is in the national interest as a job creator and means to export Alberta crude to Asian markets.

He wouldn't say whether he thought the pipeline's prospects of being built were put at risk by the B.C. election results.

This content appears as provided to The Globe by the originating wire service. It has not been edited by Globe staff.

B.C. Green Party leader Andrew Weaver says getting 'big money' out of politics is 'non-negotiable' if the Liberals and NDP want his party's support. Election results remain uncertain while 176,000 absentee ballots are counted.

The Canadian Press

Report an error