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Lower-than-expected salmon runs on the Fraser River are resulting in the closures of the dry rack fisheries.

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Tyrone McNeil of the Sto;lo Tribal Council breaks the head off and bleeds a sockeye salmon that will later be cut into strips to be hung on a dry rack to cure for up to ten days on the banks of the Fraser river near Hope, BC.

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Tyrone McNeil of the Sto;lo Tribal Council cuts sockeye salmon into strips to be hung on a dry rack to cure for up to ten days on the banks of the Fraser river near Hope, BC.

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Tyrone McNeil of the Sto;lo Tribal Council prepares to hang sockeye salmon after cutting it into strips to be hung on a dry rack to cure for up to ten days on the banks of the Fraser river near Hope, BC.

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Tyrone McNeil of the Sto;lo Tribal Council holds a sockeye salmon cut in the tradition of his mother to be hung on a dry rack to cure for up to ten days on the banks of the Fraser river near Hope, BC.

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Tyrone McNeil of the Sto;lo Tribal Council hangs a sockeye salmon cut in the tradition of his mother on a dry rack to cure for up to ten days as family memebers play on the banks of the Fraser river near Hope, BC.

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Tyrone McNeil of the Sto;lo Tribal Council checks the sockeye salmon that was cut into strips and hung on a dry rack to cure for up to ten days on the banks of the Fraser river near Hope, BC.

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Tyrone McNeil of the Sto;lo Tribal Council stands in his camp with sockeye salmon that has been cut into strips and hung on a dry rack to cure for up to ten days on the banks of the Fraser river near Hope, BC.

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A ledger kept by Tyrone McNeil of the Sto;lo Tribal Council keeps track of sockeye salmon caught that will later be cut into strips to be hung on a dry rack to cure for up to ten days on the banks of the Fraser river near Hope, BC.

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