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The Scout List: Family Fuse, biodiversity and cheap eats

A porpoise calf swims at the Vancouver Aquarium in Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday July 29, 2009. UBC’s Beaty Biodiversity Museum will have a lecture this Sunday about porpoises as part of its Way Cool Biodiversity series.

DARRYL DYCK/THE CANADIAN PRESS

A curated list of other things to do this weekend, brought to you by Scout Magazine. Find the Scout List at tgam.ca/scoutlist.

Loosen up: Looking to let off an little end-of-the-week steam? How about a few hours at a Japanese coffee shop (kissaten) complete with karaoke, juicy schnitzel (katsu) sandwiches, fluffy octopus balls (takoyaki) and Nikka whiskey sodas (liquid courage to hop on the mic for a song)? No tickets or reservations necessary – this walk-in-only gig celebrates the spirit of the hard working Japanese salaryman.

Friday, March 4, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Birds & The Beets (55 Powell St. Vancouver), www.heretherestudio.com

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Art: At this year's incarnation of the kid-friendly open house Family Fuse at the Vancouver Art Gallery, you can expect everything from hip-hop, screen print, collage and sketch workshops to proper gallery tours – all in the "Cut Copy Paste" vibe of the current MashUp exhibition. From collage and montage to splicing, sampling, hacking and remixing, this survey of the history of mash-up involves 371 works from 156 artists and took three years to pull together. Kids under 12 get in free with a paying adult.

Sat–Sun, March 5 and 6 | 10am–5pm | Vancouver Art Gallery (750 Hornby St.) | $22.50, www.vanartgallery.bc.ca

Contribute: A 2011 survey by the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10 per cent of its contributors identify as female. So women should take some time to visit the Emily Carr University Library on Friday or The Western Front on Sunday to contribute to an all-day communal updating of Wikipedia entries on subjects related to art and feminism. Organizers will offer Wikipedia tutorials, reference materials, childcare and refreshments; all you have to do is show up with your laptop, power cord and ideas.

Fri, March 4 | 11am-6pm | Emily Carr University Library (1399 Johnston St. Granville Island); Sun, March 6 | 11-5pm | The Western Front (303 8 Ave E.), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Meetup/Vancouver/ArtAndFeminism_2016

Scienc: Head out to UBC's Beaty Biodiversity Museum for its Way Cool Biodiversity series this Sunday and a lecture about porpoises. From the museum: "Dr. Anna Hall will present an overview of the worlds' porpoise species, from those found in the coastal waters of British Columbia to the far reaches of the Southern Ocean off Antarctica. Porpoise natural history and conservation will be the focus of the talk, with details of how to get involved in the protection and conservation of these small, elusive marine mammals."

Sun, March 6 | 1pm | UBC Biodiversity Museum | Free with $12 admission, http://beatymuseum.ubc.ca/

Cheap Eats: On the first Friday of each month, the Holy Trinity Ukrainian Orthodox Cathedral off Main Street serves an authentic Ukrainian dinner and a warm, fuzzy community glow for cheap. A "traditional dinner" consists of six perogies, two cabbage rolls, sauerkraut or salad and sausage and costs just $13 (upgrade to a "super dinner" for $16 and pick up an extra four perogies and another cabbage roll). If you are looking for something a little lighter, a mini dinner is only $9 (four perogies, a cabbage roll, and some Ukrainian koubassa). It is an awesome deal that could only get better if they had $2.50 desserts. Wait…they do. See you there.

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Fri, March 4 | 5-8pm | Holy Trinity Ukrainian Cathedral | 154 E 10th | $3.50 – $15, www.uocvancouver.com

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