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In pictures: The faces of development in Sierra Leone

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A young girl is bathed in late afternoon light in the village of Manonkoh, Sierra Leone. Village leaders here say that their life has been affected dramatically by mining developments nearby.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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Children work to separate and crush rice in the village of Romaro, Sierra Leone. Mining and agricultural business in this area have given some new opportunities to villagers, but they are having to adapt to a new wage-based economy.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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Yeabu Sesay, 45, spreads out rice to dry in the sun in the village of Romaro, Sierra Leone.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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A water reservoir is surrounded by a high security fence on the edge of the Addax Bioenergy sugarcane plantation in Sierra Leone.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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A young girl searches for shell fish in an area where the community’s rice fields have flooded adjacent to their village of Manonkoh, Sierra Leone.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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A woman walks down the median of a new stretch of highway west of Freetown, Sierra Leone. Foreign investment has also brought new infrastructure development for the country.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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A police officer directs traffic in a bustling downtown intersection in Freetown, Sierra Leone.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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The sun begins to set beyond the Kroo Bay Slum in Freetown, Sierra Leone. While foreign investment has flooded into the country, change for the average person is slow to come.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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Pigs and people alike scavenge in a canal that cuts through the Kroo Bay Slum in Freetown, Sierra Leone. Sierra Leone remains one of the world’s poorest nations.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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Thousands of people crowd onto the morning ferry – the MP Freetown – to make their way from the Lungi area across the Sierra Leone River to Freetown.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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People work, trade, or sell their goods in the crowded streets of the Sierra Leone’s capital before returning home on this evening ferry.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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A student from the Prince of Wales School in Freetown, Sierra Leone heads into a Thanksgiving service at Wesley Methodist Church. The event has a shared Christian and Muslim service to accommodate everyone in the community. In a country that has been ravaged by conflict, people from these two faiths live in peaceful harmony.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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Villagers in Lungi Acre, Sierra Leone ,expressed a variety of concerns about their future amidst the growth of the Addax Bioenergy sugarcane plantation that surrounds them.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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