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An accused terrorist and former commander of Iran's rebel National Liberation Army was ordered deported from Canada yesterday after an immigration inquiry found her testimony "neither credible nor trustworthy."

Immigration board adjudicator Rolland Ladouceur ordered Mahnaz Samadi, 35, out of the country after "considering the evidence that Ms. Samadi [has]been a commander of the National Liberation Army, and considering that there are reasonable grounds to believe that this organization did engage in terrorist acts."

Mr. Ladouceur said Ms. Samadi's original testimony at an immigration inquiry had been "neither credible nor trustworthy." He noted she had lied under oath when she denied being involved with the military wing of the Mujahedeen Khalq, a group dedicated to overthrowing the Iranian government.

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Her lawyer later admitted to her affiliation.

Mr. Ladouceur expressed sympathy for Ms. Samadi's opposition to the Iranian regime and the country's poor human-rights record, but noted that the National Liberation Army had itself committed terrorist acts, including bombings in Tehran that killed civilians.

Ms. Samadi said she fled Iran after she and family members were arrested and tortured in the 1980s and 1990s.

She moved to the United States in 1994, where she campaigned against the Iranian government and gained a reputation as a prominent human-rights activist.

Ms. Samadi, a U.S. resident, admits she entered Canada illegally. She was arrested in mid-February at an Ottawa apartment.

Officials wouldn't say where Ms. Samadi would cross the border, and Immigration Canada's lawyers wouldn't answer questions from reporters.

Ms. Samadi's lawyer, Warren Creates, said his client had been penalized for bombings that were against "legitimate targets" -- including an Iranian prison governor who presided over mass executions.

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