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An investigation into allegations of witness tampering against an Alberta politician has concluded there is no evidence to support criminal charges.

Police and prosecutors in New Brunswick said Alberta Solicitor-General Heather Forsyth did not commit an offence in a case involving her son.

An RCMP officer had testified at a military hearing that Ms. Forsyth called her son's former girlfriend and persuaded her not to testify at his earlier criminal trial on a charge of assaulting her.

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Ms. Forsyth, legislature member for Calgary Fish Creek, was not Solicitor-General at the time she allegedly approached the woman.

"Heather Forsyth's involvement was nothing more than what one would reasonably expect from any mother and certainly not contrary to the law," wrote a prosecutor from the New Brunswick Attorney-General's department.

Alberta Justice Minister Dave Hancock had asked the department to look into the allegations.

The criminal case against Ms. Forsyth's son collapsed when the alleged victim did not show up in court to testify.

Corporal Thomas Forsyth was convicted of assault at the court martial in 1999 at Gagetown, N.B., and was sentenced to eight months in prison, but remains free on bail pending his appeal.

Mr. Hancock has refused to discuss Ms. Forsyth's actions and would not confirm she called the victim.

Ms. Forsyth maintained all along it was a personal matter and declined to comment.

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On Thursday she issued a brief statement.

"The outcome of the review by the New Brunswick Attorney-General's office is welcome but not unexpected," she said.

"The case involving my son remains before the court. It is of deep concern to my family and me. I am unable to make any further comment without potentially prejudicing the case."

Last December, a Liberal member of the Alberta Legislature caused a ruckus when she demanded Ms. Forsyth resign.

Laurie Blakeman said it was "totally unacceptable" that someone she characterized as having a limited grasp of the justice system should be one of the province's top justice officials.

"To believe it is acceptable to interfere with a witness subverts the entire process the solicitor general is supposed to uphold," Ms. Blakeman said in the legislature.

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According to a transcript of the court martial, Thomas Forsyth's former girlfriend testified she decided not to appear as a witness at his criminal trial because his mother had assured her he would receive counselling.

The woman told the military court she decided to give evidence, however, after learning her former boyfriend had attended only two counselling sessions and stopped going when the charges in criminal court were dropped.

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