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In an upset, Alliance Candidate Joe Peschisolido, former president of the Canadian Taxpayer's Federation, defeated Liberal cabinet minister Raymond Chan in the riding of Richmond. Mr. Chan was Canada's first secretary of state for Asia-Pacific and the first Canadian of Chinese descent named to the Privy Council.

Meanwhile, the NDP held on to their two seats in the region, with the re-election of New Democrat Svend Robinson in the riding of Burnaby-Douglas and MP Libby Davies in Vancouver East.

In the riding of Vancouver-Quadra, distinguished public servant Stephen Owen held the seat for the Liberals against a strong challenge from Alliance candidate Kerry-Lynne Findlay. Fisheries Minister Herb Dhaliwal also pulled through a close fight in Vancouver-South Burnaby.

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Bucking the national trend, the Canadian Alliance romped through the Vancouver region in the federal election last night, picking up seats from the Liberal Party.

The Alliance held on to their seats in the area, including MPs Val Meredith in South Surrey-White and Rock John Cummins in Delta-South Richmond, and claimed victory in the Liberal riding of Port Moody-Coquitlam-Port Coquitlam, where outspoken MP Lou Sekora was defeated.

B.C. is sending a strong contingency of Alliance members to Ottawa "to keep this prime minister honest," said Alliance MP John Reynolds, who was re-elected in the riding of West Vancouver-Sunshine Coast.

Meanwhile, indicating possible upsets, the results were jumping back and forth last night in New Democrat Svend Robinson's riding of Burnaby-Douglas and in the riding of Vancouver-Quadra. Distinguished public servant Stephen Owen managed to hold onto his seat for the Liberals.

In the riding of Vancouver South-Burnaby federal fisheries minister Herb Dhaliwal was fighting to survive. The Liberals though were showing surprising strength in Vancouver East where immigration lawyer Mason Loh was challenging NDP MP Libby Davies.

Mr. Sekora, who served as Coquitlam mayor for several years, had tried hard to show that his by-election victory in March of 1998 was not an aberration.

His precarious position was obvious a few days before the election, when he tried to convince voters that the federal government really did care about B.C. and would "soon" make a campaign-style announcement of financial support for local pet projects.

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His best wishes, however, were not enough. Mr. Chrétien remained silent and the NDP quickly pounced on his statements as "Mr. Sekora's desperate cry for help." He was not even close in the race against 24-year-old Alliance candidate James Moore. Mr. Sekora, who served as Coquitlam mayor for several years, had tried hard to show that his by-election victory in March of 1998 was not an aberration.

His precarious position was obvious a few days before the election, when he tried to convince voters that the federal government really did care about B.C. and would "soon" make a campaign-style announcement of financial support for local pet projects.

His best wishes, however, were not enough. Mr. Chrétien remained silent and the NDP quickly pounced on his statements as "Mr. Sekora's desperate cry for help." He was not even close in the race against 24-year-old Alliance candidate James Moore.

Meanwhile, in the suburban riding of New Westminster-Coquitlam-Burnaby, the Liberals looked to NDP supporters to grab the riding from the Alliance.

Incumbent Alliance MP Paul Forseth won in 1997.

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