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Quebec students have taken to the streets of Montreal to protest against planned tuition hikes.

Paul Chiasson/Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press

There are more legal problems for the daughter of a prominent Quebec politician who already faced charges following last year's raucous student protests.

Yalda Machouf-Khadir, the daughter of Quebec solidaire's Amir Khadir, is among six protesters being sued by the Universite de Montreal for a group total of $100,000 in damages.

The university is seeking compensation after a security guard was injured and dozens of rooms at its campus were vandalized on April 12, 2012.

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Court documents say it started off as a peaceful protest by Quebec student associations fighting tuition increases.

But they say there was a deliberate plan to ransack the university, hatched by a number of individuals who did not belong to the student groups.

Windows were shattered and doors were smashed when about 300 protesters forced their way into the university.

Video recordings and fingerprints taken by authorities were presented as evidence in the documents, which were filed this week in Quebec Superior Court.

The documents claim that Machouf-Khadir grabbed a wooden partition and used it to obstruct the view of campus police.

She also allegedly used a black flag to prevent them from filming.

The legal documents say the daughter of the Quebec solidaire politician also shoved around the campus cops and tried to remove a camera from one of their hands.

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The university's amphitheatre, which had just undergone major renovations, was damaged along with 36 other rooms. Paint was tossed around the hall of honour.

Just before the protesters left, someone set off a fire alarm and the university was sent a bill of $2,000 to cover the cost of firefighters who were called in.

Machouf-Khadir was also arrested last year at her father's Montreal home and slapped with 11 charges in connection with different events that took place during the students protests.

The charges included break and enter, conspiracy, mischief and assaulting a police officer.

Amir Khadir spent several years as the co-leader of the small, left-wing party. But he recently stepped aside after the other co-leader, Francoise David, was elected to a seat last September that allowed her to join him in the legislature.

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