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Rorschach blot 01 - Plate 1 (bat, butterfly, moth)

The College of Psychologists of British Columbia is asking the Saskatchewan College of Physicians and Surgeons to launch an investigation after a doctor in Moose Jaw, Sask., posted the famous Rorschach ink blot tests and their meanings online.

The B.C. college also issued a letter to its membership warning that publication of test results is prohibited.

Those who oppose the actions of James Heilman worry that posting the so-called answers to the ink blot test may open the door for people to abuse the system. "We may have an individual that is unfortunately presenting responses that don't represent who they are," Vancouver psychologist Dr. Mary Korpach said.

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She said that could have serious consequences if a violent or dangerous offender was applying for parole. "We want to be able to administer some testing that allows us an accurate picture of that individual's functioning."

Dr. Heilman, an emergency ward doctor with the Five Hills Health Region, has said his hobby is editing medical pages for Wikipedia, the online user-generated encyclopedia. He said the idea for posting the ink blots on the Wikipedia page about Rorschach tests came during a discussion with a fellow online editor. It struck him as silly that they weren't already there. He has noted the ink blots are not copyrighted and can be viewed in library books or on other Web sites.

"Wikipedia is attempting to catalogue the depth and breadth of human knowledge," he told CTV News. "This area of psychology is part of human knowledge and definitely belongs on the encyclopedia.

"The psychological community is trying to exclude everybody outside their field from taking part in discussions related to what they do. And personally, I think that's bad science."

Investigations by the college usually take less than 60 days. If there are no grounds for professional misconduct charges, the college never makes the results public.

Swiss psychologist Hermann Rorschach created the ink blot test in 1921. It consists of five black ink blots, two black and red ink blots and three multi-coloured ink blots.

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