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CANADA 150

Canada 150 from coast to coast

See how people are celebrating Canada Day across the country.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks during the Canada Day noon hour show on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Saturday, July 1, 2017.

The latest:

  • Peter Mansbridge is anchoring Canada Day celebrations in Ottawa for his last day at the CBC
  • Indigenous activists put up a tepee on Parliament Hill Thursday night
  • Justin Trudeau announced Canada’s newest astronauts
  • One hundred and fifty new Canadians were granted citizenship at Ontario’s legislature this morning in Toronto
  • A boatload of 75 people headed out before dawn on the North Atlantic off Newfoundland to welcome Canada Day
  • Lawyers from coast to coast are prepared to spend their Canada Day helping those affected by the immigration ban

Western Canada

Carol Ip sports Canadian flags on her head as she joins hundreds of other people as they they participate in a group yoga session celebrating Canada’s 150th birthday as a community at the McArthurGlen Designer Outlet on July 1, 2017 in Richmond, Canada. (Photo by Jeff Vinnick/Getty Images)



A flag-draped pony grazes before the start of a parade during Canada Day celebrations in Cremona, Alta., Saturday, July 1, 2017.


Winnipeggers form a "Living Leaf" downtown, Saturday, July 1, 2017, Manitoba.

Winnipeggers got together today to celebrate Canada's 150th birthday by forming a "Living Leaf" at the historic downtown intersection of Portage and Main, Saturday, July 1, 2017. Organizers said that 4000 people showed up to show off their love for Canada.

– The Canadian Press

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Ontario

Security has never been tighter for a Canada Day party on the Hill, and despite an initial police crackdown, Indigenous activists successfully set their tepee up at the foot of the Peace Tower and saw their message reverberate across the country.

"I'm not sure the objective was to meet the Prime Minister. The objective was to assert ourselves on Algonquin territory," protester Ashley Courchene said.

Candace Day Neveau speaks to reporters after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau met with people in a teepee on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Friday, June 30, 2017.

On Friday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau visited the tepee.

In a video filmed inside the tepee and posted on Facebook, Mr. Trudeau told protesters their impromptu discussion symbolized the inherent difficulties of creating "nation-to-nation" discussions and getting out of "colonial structures."

The Canada Day agenda in the national capital included a visit from Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall and a speech from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Trudeau and the prince sat down for a meeting this morning at Rideau Hall, where the two commiserated briefly about the conditions outside.

"We're Canadians," Trudeau was heard to say over the din of camera shutters. "We can handle a little weather."

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– Daniel LeBlanc and The Canadian Press


People celebrate Canada Day near the giant inflatable duck that sits on Toronto’s Harbourfront on Saturday, July 1, 2017.

A giant rubber duck that caused feathers to fly for weeks before its arrival has settled into its temporary new home on Toronto's waterfront for Canada 150.

The six-storey-tall yellow duck was inflated on Toronto's harbourfront ahead of the weekend RedPath Waterfront Festival.

The duck's 200-thousand-dollar price tag had some critics crying foul, questioning the bird's connection to Canada 150 festivities.

– The Canadian Press


Quebec

A colourful parade and a small protest are among the ways Canada's 150th birthday was marked in Montreal.

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The parade route was lined with thousands of spectators on Saturday, many carrying umbrellas and waving red-and-white flags as they cheered groups of dancers who went whirling by.

But in another part of town, a handful of protesters marched through the city's Old Port to denounce what they call Canada's colonialist and racist policies.

Police hold back demonstraters during a protest in Montreal, Saturday, July 1, 2017.

About 20 people dressed in black threw coloured leaflets and chanted slogans as they made their way through one of the city's most crowded tourist areas, closely monitored by dozens of uniformed police officers.

In a speech, one of the organizers said there is no reason to celebrate Canada's 150th birthday due to way the country treats immigrants, indigenous people and the environment.

Montreal police say there were no arrests and no vandalism.

The Canadian Press


New Brunswick

A traditional longhouse has been erected near the New Brunswick legislature, with a First Nations elder saying it's not to protest Canada 150 but to educate that indigenous people were present long before Confederation.

Alma Brooks of the Wolastoq Grand Council says the temporary structure on the Fredericton riverfront is a place of teaching and "a chance to celebrate time immemorial."

"It's not a protest. Hopefully it will be a way of opening the door a crack for discussions around many long term issues that have been ignored," she said Friday.

The birch structure in Fredericton, covered with tarps and cedar brush, is oriented east-west on a grassy strip along the edge of the St. John River.

It's an area frequented by people who walk and jog, and a good vantage point for Canada Day fireworks.

– The Canadian Press


Nova Scotia

People take the citizenship oath at Pier 21 immigration centre in Halifax on Saturday, July 1, 2017.

Fifty-three people from more than 20 different countries celebrated Canada's 150th birthday by taking the oath of citizenship in Halifax.

Members of the crowd joined the Canadians-to-be as they raised their right hands and vowed to fulfil their duties as citizens.

Politicians from all three levels of government lined up to congratulate their new constituents as they received their certificates of Canadian citizenship.

The ceremony was held at the Pier 21 immigration centre on the Halifax waterfront, where more than one million immigrants took their first steps in Canada between 1928 and 1971.

– The Canadian Press


Newfoundland and Labrador

People take part in an Iceberg Quest sunrise tour off the coast of Cape Spear, N.L. on Saturday, July 1, 2017. Rain and low clouds blocked the sunrise over the flashing lighthouse at Cape Spear but that didn’t bother the flag-waving crowd.


Territories

Britain's Prince Charles drinks tea during a tour of Sylvia Grinnell Park in Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada, June 29, 2017. The visit was part of his Canada 150 tour.


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