Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism.
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Cancel Anytime
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Canada’s most-awarded
newsroom for a reason
Stay informed for a
lot less, cancel anytime
“Exemplary reporting on
COVID-19” – Herman L
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99per week for the first 24weeks
Just $1.99per week for the first 24weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); } //

Federal Environment Minister David Anderson said yesterday he will continue his push for clean energy export credits under the Kyoto Protocol, despite harsh criticism from Europe.

The export credits are seen as a way to reduce the potential cost of ratifying the Kyoto treaty, which business groups and the Alberta government have pegged at tens of billions of dollars and hundreds of thousands of jobs. The federal government has yet to release an official cost projection.

Mr. Anderson said Canada will unveil a formal proposal for the credit plan at a United Nations meeting in Whistler, British Columbia, next month.

Story continues below advertisement

"There's no question that this issue becomes more critical for Canada because of the United States's withdrawal from the Kyoto process," he told reporters at a news conference yesterday after playing host to a meeting of G8 environment ministers in Banff, Alta., on the weekend. "And it is something that needs to be looked at on its merits and not on the basis of political position."

But Mr. Anderson's plan met stiff opposition from representatives of the European Union and individual European countries throughout the two-day, closed-door meeting of ministers.

German Environment Minister Jurgen Trittin said the export-credit proposal, in which Canada could claim emissions reductions for clean fuel it sells to the United States, could backfire on Canada.

For example, he said, the plan could mean expensive technology imported from Germany that would dramatically reduce Canadian greenhouse gas emissions could result in credits going back to Europe. "This is not an idea that has been thought to its real final consequences," he said after a meeting yesterday morning on climate control and measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Margot Wallstrom, the EU's Environment Commissioner, said the clean-fuel credits would not be granted. She pointed out that Canada has already wrung out considerable concessions in previous meetings.

"We think this . . . would completely change the whole structure and architecture of the Kyoto Protocol," she said.

"It would be really sad if Canada wouldn't ratify in the end," she said, adding that "the blame should not be on us, who are inside the Kyoto Protocol, but rather to push the Americans to come back on board."

Story continues below advertisement

An international treaty to address climate change, Kyoto would see the world's industrialized countries commit to meeting greenhouse gas reduction targets by 2008 to 2012.

The United States backed out of the treaty last year, saying it would follow its own path to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

While Prime Minister Jean Chrétien's government has said it will ratify the Kyoto Protocol, its intentions are seen as increasingly in doubt.

"Their position is incredibly mushy," said Greenpeace climate change director Benedict Southworth.

"What they've done is they've basically tried to duck the issue. They've tried to keep it off the agenda."

The meeting of G8 ministers was intended to address a variety of environmental issues, but climate change quickly took centrestage, despite Mr. Anderson's efforts to deal with issues such as environment-related health in developing countries, especially concerning children.

Story continues below advertisement

"A child dies every 10 seconds -- every 10 seconds -- think how many children have died since we started this press conference," he told reporters.

The violent protests that have characterized recent meetings of world leaders didn't materialize in Banff.

Police were out in force in this resort town as they used the meeting to help train for the G8 leaders summit set for June 26-27 at nearby Kananaskis.

RCMP officers, in and out of uniform, with dogs and on bicycles, patrolled the town and the hotel where the meeting was held throughout the weekend.

About activists held a peaceful demonstration yesterday morning, marching to the hotel to protest against Canada's delay in ratifying the Kyoto treaty.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies