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CARE Canada says a volunteer died during a fundraising climb on Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania.

The agency says Marcel Bujold, 65, of Carleton, Quebec, died Thursday as he was being evacuated from the mountain due to illness.

A. John Watson, the president and C-E-O of CARE Canada, said they are devastated by the news.

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Andrea Lanthier-Seymour, a CARE Canada spokeswoman, said after suffering some distress Wednesday, Mr. Bujold was provided oxygen and was accompanied by one medically trained guide and four porters to return to the base of the mountain.

But his condition deteriorated, and hours into the evacuation he died.

Former deputy prime minister John Manley, who is participating in the climb, said on his Globe and Mail blog Saturday the news of Mr. Bujold's death was devastating for everyone involved in the climb. Mr. Bujold was climbing with a separate group from Mr. Manley's when he fell ill.

"At this time, I still don't know what was the cause of death nor whether it was mountain or atmosphere related. It was devastating news for everyone involved in the climb," Mr. Manley wrote.

"We developed a plan to try to help as much as possible Marcel's wife, Pauline, who was climbing with him. I contacted the Canadian High Commission in Dar el Salaam, which immediately began to take action to assist her by sending a consular officer to Moshi the next morning," he wrote.

"Early next morning (we were wakened at 5) we informed the climbers of Paul's departure, and of the sad event in the other group. Few in our group knew Marcel but one who did said that he loved mountains, he was deeply involved in CARE, and that this was to be the climb of his life. Many tears were shed, and we all resolved to carry on, dedicating our climb to Marcel's memory."

Four climbers returned to the base to be with Pauline Bujold.

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Ms. Lanthier-Seymour said the climb up Africa's highest peak - at 5,895 metres - is not complicated technically, but is at a very high altitude and "people respond to high altitudes differently."

She said people on the climb told the agency Mr. Bujold was fit, and that people as old as 80 have taken part in such climbs.

An autopsy will determine the cause of death.

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