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The University of Winnipeg's Buhler Centre.

JOHN WOODS/The Globe and Mail

The Globe and Mail's Canadian University Report's profiles of more than 70 universities across the country give snapshots on many factors, from educational experience to the feel of the campus.

SASKATCHEWAN UNIVERSITY OF REGINA

Regina

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Tuition: $3,688.05

Students: 14,849

When the University of Regina became a degree-granting institution, it was affiliated with the University of Saskatchewan.

It wasn't until 1974 that the UR gained its status as an autonomous university. Today, the University of Regina shares its campus with three federated institutions – Campion College, Luther College and the First Nations University of Canada – all of which contribute to the diverse program offerings of the UR.

To better prepare students for the workforce, the University of Regina encourages students to gain professional experience.

Students in the faculty of arts, for example, can participate in the school-credited three-week Arts Work Experience Internship program, which provides arts students with work experience, as well as professional contacts.

The school broke its enrolment record this year, with almost 15,000 students. Francophone students can turn to the U of R's La Cité universitaire francophone hub for French-language courses and research offered on campus and across the province.

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UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN

Saskatoon

Tuition: $6,785.19

Students: 22,912

The University of Saskatchewan has been around for 110 years and is located near the South Saskatchewan River in Saskatoon.

It offers a wide range of directentry programs for incoming students – agriculture and bioresources, arts and science, business, education, engineering and kinesiology, plus additional course options at St. Thomas More College. U of S has one of the highest tuition rates in the Prairie provinces, with only the University of Alberta, University of Calgary and Mount Royal University charging more.

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About 12 per cent of all undergraduate and graduate students (totalling close to 3,000) selfidentify as Indigenous. In recognition of this, U of S features a wide range of initiatives geared toward the on-campus Indigenous community. This year, at the annual Aboriginal Achievement Week, the powwow – which has been held for more than 30 years – drew almost 5,000 attendees.

MANITOBA BRANDON UNIVERSITY

Brandon (main), Winnipeg, Ashern, Portage la Prairie

Tuition: $4,396

Students: 3,170

Brandon University offers students many postsecondary options. In addition to degree programs, it boasts a wide range of graduate, pre-professional certification and certificate programs that allow students to enhance their degrees.

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Incoming students can explore courses in several faculties, including arts, science, education and health studies, as well as the School of Music.

To supplement students' academic experience with practical training, Brandon University plans to offer co-op education programming in numerous arts and science departments starting in 2018.

This initiative is in response to an increasing demand from students seeking a seamless transition into the work force after graduation.

Brandon University's Tourism Research Centre, which opened in 2003, recently announced a new study conducted by BU professors Christopher Malcolm and Doug Ramsey, who researched tourist attractions in small towns to determine what drives people to visit rural areas.

UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA

Winnipeg

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Tuition: $4,124.50

Students: 29,311

The University of Manitoba opened in 1877, making it the first university established in Western Canada. Today, the school boasts the largest student population in the province and offers more than 100 undergraduate- and graduatelevel programs. The school has the lowest tuition in Manitoba, but its students incur more debt than other students in the province.

U of M is currently leading the Hudson Bay System Study, which is investigating the impact of climate change and hydroelectric regulation on Hudson Bay in northern Manitoba. The study made headlines recently, when the increasing rate of melting Arctic ice prevented a team from embarking on a related research expedition into Canada's North.

This year, Taylor Morriseau graduated with a bachelor of science degree with double honours in microbiology and genetics – just in time to start her master of science degree in the department of pharmacology and therapeutics at U of M. A member of the Peguis First Nation, Ms. Morriseau plans to apply cutting-edge science to address long-standing health issues faced by Indigenous people.

UNIVERSITY OF WINNIPEG

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Winnipeg

Tuition: $5,154.49

Students: 9,338

Located in Winnipeg's inner city, this university also happens to be situated on Treaty One territory and on the Métis Nation's homeland. UWinnipeg's location is a driving force of its commitment to Indigenous scholarship and community outreach.

There are several on-campus initiatives aimed at advancing Indigenization and reconciliation.

In September 2016, the school introduced a mandatory Indigenous studies course. UWinnipeg also offers the Indigenous Summer Scholars program, which assists Indigenous undergraduate students' transition into advanced study.

Despite UWinnipeg's efforts to make university affordable, its tuition fees increased for two consecutive years. Average tuition for the 2015-16 school year was $4,549 – about $600 less than average tuition in the faculties of arts and science today. The University of Winnipeg also has the lowest graduation rates in Manitoba; 43 per cent of its undergraduate students complete their degrees in seven years.

* Most recent available figure

** From website and not verified by university

*** Trimester system


Interested in profiles of other Canadian universities? View the rest of the profiles here.

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