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Education Ticker: Obama gains four more years of education reform

Students supporting U.S. President Barack Obama react as they watch election returns come in inside the Kennedy Forum at the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government.

Scott Eisen/Bloomberg

Obama could try to limit tuition increases

By a wide margin, American academics financially supported the re-election of Barack Obama over Mitt Romney's bid. Now, the U.S. President is likely to continue extending the power of his office over education, regulating teacher-education programs and perhaps applying the brakes to increases in tuition fees.

Undocumented college students score win in Maryland

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Among the ballot measures that passed on Tuesday was Maryland's Question 4, which allows some groups of undocumented students to pay in-state tuition at state colleges. Dubbed the Maryland Dream Act, the legislation is the first of this type to be approved by voters. In order to pay in-state tuition, undocumented students must have been high-school students in Maryland for three years and earned a diploma or its equivalent.

The army behind Nate Silver

It's not just supercool nerd Nate Silver who correctly predicted the election outcome (every state right). A growing number of "poll quants" are gaining attention by mining "what really has predictive power in a political campaign."

Australian universities face 'doom and gloom'

It is not only universities in Canada that are rethinking their traditional structures as institutions of higher learning that teach everything to everyone. A new Australian report argues that the country's institutions must change over the next decade – and be run more like businesses – if they are to survive cuts in government funding.

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