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Colleges have changed along with the society around them. We asked selected staff to reflect on some transformations they have seen over the years.

Brett Rabideau/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Colleges have changed along with the society around them. We asked selected staff to reflect on some transformations they have seen over the years.

Laura Jo Gunter, senior vice-president, academic, George Brown College, Toronto

"Over the past 15 years technology has been a significant force in changing teaching and learning in postsecondary education.

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The maturing of the Internet brings a new breadth and depth of information, and smart devices allow students to access that information from nearly anywhere, at any time.

Educators are adapting by embracing a new model of education that fosters interaction and uses technology as an enabler.

This has given rise to the flipped classroom, a pedagogical model that reverses the traditional learning environment by delivering instructional content, often online, outside a university or college setting.

By delivering instructional content online and using the physical classroom as a place to collaborate, discuss concepts, solve problems and apply learnings, the flipped classroom represents a substantial shift from the classroom of the early 2000's."

Nina Koniuch, associate dean, health, wellness and sciences, Georgian College, Barrie, Ont.

"What's gradually changed is the perception of the value of a college versus university education. The lines have blurred and an appreciation for the needs of students now seems to be paramount, regardless of the pathway they choose. A learner is a learner – and having the opportunity for that blend of a college and university opportunity has strengthened the student experience overall. Today's reality is that not all college students are direct from high school, often students who pursue a college diploma already have a degree, and vice versa."

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