Skip to main content

Hundreds of natives, many who travelled all the way from Grassy Narrows, and many other support groups marched through Toronto's downtown to the front lawn of Queen's Park on April 7, 2010, to protest 40 years of mercury poisoning in their water.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

Ontario's minister of indigenous relations and reconciliation says he wants to hear first hand about mercury poisoning from leaders of the Grassy Narrows First Nation.

David Zimmer says it's time he and Environment Minister Glen Murray sit down with the Grassy Narrows leadership to discuss various reports about the mercury contamination that has plagued the remote northwestern Ontario community for decades.

The two cabinet ministers, along with some technical experts from the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change, will travel next week to Grassy Narrows, near the Manitoba border.

Story continues below advertisement

Zimmer says the government wants to find out any new information from the community and sort out the different reports on the mercury contamination before deciding on a course of action.

Some Grassy Narrows residents have suffered mercury poisoning since the Dryden Chemical Co. dumped 9,000 kilograms of it into the Wabigoon and English River systems during the 1960s. The community was told to stop eating local fish in the 1970s.

Chief Simon Fobister Sr. said Tuesday he wants the government to investigate another possible source of contamination after a former worker at the Dryden mill told the Toronto Star he had buried more than 50 barrels of mercury and salt in a pit near Grassy Narrows in 1972.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter