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Canada Green Party shuts down in Nova Scotia due to lack of support

Green Party signs

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The Green Party of Nova Scotia says it's shutting down because it doesn't have enough support.

Outgoing interim Leader Brynn Nheiley also said in a statement Tuesday evening that no one was interested in taking on the leadership role.

Nheiley said that support and engagement have dwindled over the years for a number of reasons, including the political climate inside and outside of the province.

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"I take responsibility for my own role in this outcome. While several people have come forward to aid the party, I was not able to successfully harness this new energy and these new ideas, nor did I effectively reach out and communicate with those who have always supported the ideals of our party," said Nheiley.

"Please recognize the contribution that our party has made over the past decade. We have been a crucial participant in conversations about full-cost accounting, guaranteed annual income, and building a fair and sustainable future."

Emily McMillan, executive director of the federal Green party, led by former Nova Scotian Elizabeth May, released a statement Wednesday saying the announcement of the provincial party's demise may have been premature.

McMillan said there was no formal process of dissolution, as required by the provincial party's constitution.

"So, it is much too early to say that the GPNS is no more," McMillan said. "We expect this situation to be temporary."

She said the federal party was trying to determine what happened, but she suggested its provincial counterpart was likely suffering from "growing pains" as it was in the process of seeking a new leader.

"We know there is real Green strength on the ground in Nova Scotia and we have been hearing from Green members that they want the provincial party to continue,"McMillan said.

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A Green party candidate has never been elected in Nova Scotia.

The party, which received official status in 2006, ran a full slate of candidates during the 2006 and 2009 provincial elections, but only 16 candidates for the 2013 election.

Elsewhere in the Maritimes, Green party politicians have garnered support in recent years, winning provincial seats in New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

Peter Bevan-Baker made history last May when he won the Green party's first-ever seat in the P.E.I. legislature.

Similarly in New Brunswick, provincial Green party Leader David Coon won the party's first-ever seat during the 2014 provincial election.

The Green Party of Nova Scotia says the documents that guide the party will remain available should anyone decide to start it up again.

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It said it hopes to reimburse those who have paid their 2016 membership dues.

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