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Automated milking machines, used to milk, measure, and record the amount of milk from each cow, are seen at the Mount Kolb dairy farm in Caledon, Ont. on Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. (James MacDonald/Bloomberg)
Automated milking machines, used to milk, measure, and record the amount of milk from each cow, are seen at the Mount Kolb dairy farm in Caledon, Ont. on Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. (James MacDonald/Bloomberg)

How butter's surge in popularity led to Trump's attack on the Canadian dairy industry Add to ...

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Three years ago, a team of researchers published in the Annals of Internal Medicine an innocuous-sounding study titled: Association of Dietary, Circulating, and Supplement Fatty Acids With Coronary Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

That study, which disputed the commonly held notion that saturated fat leads to heart disease, sent the food world into a frenzy. “Butter is Back,” a New York Times headline proclaimed. “Julia Child, goddess of fat, is beaming somewhere,” the paper wrote. In Canada, butter sales skyrocketed, to the point where producers had trouble meeting supply and parts of the country experienced shortages.

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