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A group of young women climb around in Dumpsters in the back alleys of Coquitlam, B.C., searching for discarded food. These women are not homeless or poor, but choose to scavenge their meals this way. They are part of a movement called 'freeganism'. A 'freegan' is someone who gathers edible food from the dumpster bins of grocery stores or food stands that would otherwise have been thrown away. Freegans aim to spend little, if no money on purchasing food and other goods. Rather, they see the potential in discarded items whether it be clothes, food, or other goods. The choice to not spend money on items such as food is rarely based on a financial need; rather it is trying to address issues of over-consumption and excess.

Mya Wollf, 28, a practising 'freegan' who has been vegan for nine years, shows off her 'vegan' tattoo in an alley behind Commercial Drive in Vancouver, British Columbia. A 'Freegan' is someone who gathers edible food from the garbage bins of grocery stores or food stands that would otherwise have been thrown away.

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Robin Pickell, 23, a 'freegan', rides her bike to different dumpsters to find edible food in an alley behind Commercial Drive. Freegans aim to spend little or no money purchasing food and other goods, not through financial need but to try to address issues of over-consumption and excess.

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May Wollf, a practising 'freegan', climbs into a dumpster while Robin Pickell tears open a garbage bag in an alley behind Commercial Drive in Vancouver.

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Mya Wollf (R), and Robin Pickell, 23, who are both 'freegans', sort through a dumpster for edible food in an alley behind Commercial Drive.

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Mya Wollf and Robin Pickell, practising 'freegans', sort through food they recently found in a dumpster.

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Robin Pickell, a 'freegan', eats a green bean that was scavenged in Vancouver.

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Anna-Rae Douglass a pracitsing 'freegan', looks through her fridge of scavenged food at her house in Vancouver.

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Madison Dewalt, a 'freegan', prepares food that was scavenged by the household in Vancouve.

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May Wollf a practising 'freegan', cuts scavenged bread in her kitchen in Vancouver.

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May Wollf a practising 'freegan', holds a sandwich that is made entirely out of found or donated food in Vancouver, British Columbia.

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Ritsuko Hatanaka, 23, a practising 'freegan', eats a sandwich made from scavenged food in Vancouver.

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May Wollf (C) and Robin Pickell (R), practising 'freegans', sort through food they plucked out of a dumpster behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam, British Columbia.

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Anna-Rae Douglass, 23, a practising 'freegan', sorts through a dumpster for edible food behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam.

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Anna-Rae Douglass (L), 23, and Robin Pickell, practising 'freegans', react to finding food in a dumpster behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam.

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Anna-Rae Douglass (L), 23, and Robin Pickell, practicsing 'freegans' inspect cashew ice-cream in a dumpster behind an organic grocery store in Coquitlam.

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