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In pictures: Jubilation greets monumental Deh Cho bridge

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To maintain a clear channel in the ice, the MV Merv Hardie will operate 24 hours a day.

Bill Braden/The Globe and Mail

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The flag of the Canadian Rangers - a Canadian Armed Forces northern reserve - joined in the parade of Northerners who walked the Deh Cho Bridge's one-kilometre length, 30 metres above the freezing river, after its official opening the afternoon of Nov 30.

Bill Braden/The Globe and Mail

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The last sailing of the MV Merv Hardy ferry marked the end of 52 years of ferry service, ice bridge travel, and even helicopter grocery shuttles over the one kilometre wide Mackenzie River at Fort Providence NT.

Bill Braden/The Globe and Mail

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Passenger and heavy transport trucks share the deck of the MV Merv Hardie ferry on its last day of service crossing the Mackenzie River at Fort Providence NT Nov 30. The vessel has served the crossing since 1972.

Bill Braden/The Globe and Mail

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Deh Cho Bridge

Bill Braden/The Globe and Mail

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An Aboriginal Feed the Fire ceremony, on the banks of the Mackenzie River - Canada's largest river- blessed the travelers, waters and builders of the Deh Cho bridge.

Bill Braden/The Globe and Mail

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Fireworks display capped off the opening of the Deh Cho Bridge at Fort Providence NT. Hundreds of residents of the tiny community, and surrounding towns, turned out in -30 weather to see the display Nov 30, 2012.

Bill Braden/The Globe and Mail

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