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In this 2012 file photo provided by 5gyres.org, a sample of "microbeads" collected in eastern Lake Erie is shown on the face of a penny.

Carolyn Box/The Associated Press

Loblaws is promising that by the end of 2018 it will stop manufacturing household and cosmetic products that contain Triclosan, phthalates or microbeads.

Triclosan is found in antibacterial soaps and body washes, toothpaste and some cosmetic products and is thought to contribute to antibiotic resistance.

Phthalates are chemicals used to add fragrance to products that include body lotions and nail polishes, and to make plastics more flexible. There are concerns that they may interfere with the body's endocrine system.

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Microbeads are commonly used in facial and body scrubs, but are so tiny they aren't captured by water-treatment systems so end up in lakes and rivers — and in the gullets of fish.

Loblaw president Galen Weston says the grocery giant is working to remove the ingredients from all of its Life Brand and President's Choice products over the next three years.

Weston says in a statement that emerging science and public opinion suggest a measured move away from those ingredients is prudent.

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