Skip to main content

Fourteen Canadian war heroes were honoured with life-size busts and statues Sunday, adding human faces and stories to Canada's War Memorial in downtown Ottawa.

The statues complete what has been a major renovation of the area surrounding the memorial, just east of the Parliament Buildings.

Six years ago, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier was added to honour all fallen soldiers, and now visitors can see and read about individual heroes as part of the new Valiants Memorial.

Story continues below advertisement

Unveiling the statues less than a week before Remembrance Day, Governor-General Michaëlle Jean said honouring the valiants will add an appreciation to the sacrifices Canadian soldiers are currently making in Afghanistan.

"Today, our Canadian Forces are again involved in a war," she told the crowd gathered yesterday. "For the first time in many years, Canadians have been forced to come to terms with the harsh realities of armed conflict. For all of us, this is a painful, troubling experience. Yet it has renewed our sense of responsibility toward other peoples in other countries."

The Valiants Memorial is meant not only to commemorate 14 men and women who showed remarkable courage but to honour all Canadians who have served their country in war.

The valiants are divided into five groups: the French Regime (1534-1763), the American Revolution (1775-1783), the War of 1812 (1812-1814), the First World War (1914-1918) and the Second World War (1939-1945).

Although five of the 14 fought against Americans (including Lieutenant-Colonel John Butler, who is viewed as a murderous villain by some U.S. historians), the new monument was praised yesterday by U.S. ambassador David Wilkins, who took in the ceremony.

"I think it's a great tribute to Canadian history, Canadian heritage and the value of men and women in uniform," he said.

Arthur William Currie, 59, said he was very proud to see the statue of his grandfather, First World War general Arthur Currie, receive a prominent place in the memorial.

Story continues below advertisement

"I hope everybody in Canada, when they visit the national capital, gets a chance to come and view these valiants and go home and do a little bit of research," he said. "I hope it makes people more proud of who we are and where we came from."

The Valiants Memorial

The five statues and nine busts unveiled next to the National War Memorial yesterday depict:



--Louis Comte de Frontenac, the legendary governor of New France who withstood a British siege at Quebec in 1690.

--Pierre LeMoyne d'Iberville, who fought the British in Hudson Bay in the 1690s.

-- Joseph Brant, the Mohawk chief and warrior who sided with the British in the Revolutionary War and brought his people north afterward to settle.

Story continues below advertisement

- -John Butler, the lieutenant-colonel who raised a militia regiment, Butler's Rangers, to fight for the British in the American Revolution.

-- Sir Isaac Brock, the general who staved off a U.S. invasion in the War of 1812 and died at the battle of Queenston Heights.

--Charles-Michel d'Irumberry de Salaberry, who blocked a U.S. invasion at Chateauguay in 1813.

--Laura Secord, who brought word of an impending U.S. attack to British forces in 1813.

--Georgina Pope, the pioneering army nurse who served in the Boer War and the First World War.

-- Sir Arthur Currie, the general who was the first Canadian commander of the First World War Canadian Corps and led it to some of its greatest triumphs.

Story continues below advertisement

--Corporal Joseph Kaeble, who won a posthumous Victoria Cross for valour in June, 1918.

-- Lieutenant Hampton Gray, the flier with the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm who was the last Canadian to win a Victoria Cross. He was honoured posthumously for an attack on a Japanese destroyer in which the warship was sunk and Gray was killed.

--Captain John Wallace Thomas, the Newfoundland merchant mariner and captain of the liner Empress of Scotland who saved his vessel and the troops she carried with skillful manoeuvres under air attack in 1940.

--Major Paul Triquet, who won a Victoria Cross in Italy in 1943.

-- Pilot Officer Andy Mynarski, who won a Victoria Cross posthumously for trying to save a comrade trapped in a burning bomber over France.

Canadian Press

Report an error
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter