Skip to main content
Welcome to
super saver spring
offer ends april 20
save over $140
save over 85%
$0.99
per week for 24 weeks
Welcome to
super saver spring
$0.99
per week
for 24 weeks
// //

Chiheb Esseghaier, one of two men accused of plotting a terror attack on rail target, is led off a plane by an RCMP officer at Buttonville Airport just north of Toronto on April 23, 2013. A court-appointed lawyer is demanding a mental health assessment for one of two men found guilty of terrorism charges in a case involving a plot to derail a passenger train.

Chris Young/The Canadian Press

A judge has agreed to order a mental health assessment for one of two men found guilty of terrorism charges in a case involving a plot to derail a passenger train.

A lawyer appointed by the court to assist the self-represented Chiheb Esseghaier had asked for the assessment, saying the Tunisian national's mental health is "a real issue" in the case.

Justice Michael Code says he's ordering the assessment because while he doesn't think strong religious beliefs are equated with mental disorder, he doesn't know if there's anything about Esseghaier's personality that might make him more susceptible to religious fervour.

Story continues below advertisement

Esseghaier, who refused to participate in his trial because he wanted to be judged under the rules of the Qur'an, told the court he doesn't mind talking to doctors because he's always eager to share his religious values.

He says that doesn't mean he's acknowledging he has any mental problems.

Crown prosecutors argued that Esseghaier has extreme religious beliefs but said a mental health assessment wasn't necessary for the sentencing phase of the trial.

Esseghaier and his co-accused , Raed Jaser, were found guilty in March of a terror-related conspiracy to commit murder, which carries a sentence of up to life in prison. The jury also found the men guilty of six other terror-related charges between them.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies