Skip to main content
Complete Olympic Games coverage at your fingertips
Your inside track on the Olympic Games
Enjoy unlimited digital access
$1.99
per week for 24 weeks
Complete Olympic Games coverage at your fingertips
Your inside track onthe Olympics Games
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
// //

Canadian singer Michael Buble performs at Rogers Arena in Vancouver, B.C., on Thursday June 19, 2014. Buble announced in a Facebook post on Friday that his three-year-old son Noah has been diagnosed with cancer and that he will be putting his career on hold to be with his family.

DARRYL DYCK/The Globe and Mail

The three-year-old son of B.C.-born singer Michael Bublé and actress wife Luisana Lopilato has been diagnosed with cancer.

The couple announced the news in a statement issued Friday, adding that both will suspend their professional work to care for Noah.

"We are devastated about the recent cancer diagnosis of our oldest son Noah who is currently undergoing treatment in the U.S.," Mr. Bublé said. "We have always been very vocal about the importance of family and the love we have for our children. Luisana and I have put our careers on hold in order to devote all our time and attention to helping Noah get well."

Story continues below advertisement

Related: Why Michael Bublé's keeping it old school in a changing music industry

From the archives: Michael Bublé, straight up – the perfect tonic

The singer, who was born in Burnaby, B.C., and owns a home in West Vancouver, was unavailable for an interview on Friday. The couple did not specify the type of cancer that was diagnosed.

Noah was born in August, 2013, just a few months after Mr. Bublé released his album To Be Loved. Having released studio albums every two years since his self-titled major-label debut in 2003, he slowed down after Noah's birth, waiting until last month to release his next record Nobody But Me. His second son, Elias, turns one year old in January.

"I wanted to be a dad," Mr. Bublé told The Globe and Mail in an interview in October. "I wanted to experience what it was to be a parent, you know? … I think some people were a little trepidatious about me taking that time."

Despite fan worry, he said parenthood gave greater "perspective" to his career – when he finally began making music again, he sought new co-writers and took a spin in the producer's chair for the first time. "Little did I know that it'd change how I make a record, see myself, the way that I would say yes to opportunities I would have said no to in my life before," he said.

By putting his career matters on hold, Mr. Bublé is pulling the plug on dozens of obligations worldwide. He was in the midst of an aggressive international publicity tour for his new album scheduled through mid-December, sometimes spending less than a day in a given country.

Story continues below advertisement

Mr. Bublé was also lined up to host the BRIT Awards at London's O2 Arena in February and the Juno Awards in Ottawa in April. Representatives from both awards shows said Friday they could not comment on the singer's participation at this time.

"As far as I know, everything that he had planned, at least up until the new year, is on hold," said Steve Waxman, vice-president of publicity for Mr. Bublé's label, Warner Music.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow the authors of this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies