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Antony Piazza is shown in a Montreal police handout photo. Piazza, a 71-year-old Iranian-born man with a legally altered name, faces three criminal charges in connection with an alleged attempt to bring explosive material onto an airplane.

THE CANADIAN PRESS

A man accused of planning to carry bomb-making equipment onto an airplane has switched lawyers after one court appearance.

Antony Piazza was back in court for the second time today, this time with a new lawyer, and he requested that his bail hearing be postponed until next Wednesday.

There will be a publication ban, requested by the prosecution, for that hearing on Nov. 6. The judge has agreed that such a ban is necessary given sensitive information in the ongoing investigation.

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Piazza, 71, faces three charges following an incident that paralyzed Montreal's airport over the weekend, then led police to block off the neighbourhood where he lives.

The lawyer originally representing him at his arraignment confirmed to reporters outside the courtroom Monday that Piazza was born in Iran and his original name was Houshang Nazemi.

He was convicted of heroin-trafficking under his original name in the 1980s.

His lawyer also declared that the suspicious package that got him in trouble over the weekend was actually luggage he was carrying for someone else.

Police say the material he was carrying Sunday at a Montreal airport terminal contained everything needed to make a bomb – except the actual explosives.

The suspicious luggage was spotted at a security checkpoint in the U.S. departures area of Trudeau airport early Sunday morning.

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