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In 1939, Canada forced the MS St. Louis, carrying more than 900 Jewish refugees, to sail back to Europe where about 250 of its passengers later died in the Holocaust

It is a gleaming monument intended to shed light on one of the darkest chapters of Canadian history. The Wheel of Conscience, shown in this artist's rendition, designed by renowned architect Daniel Libeskind, will be unveiled Thursday at Pier 21, Canada's immigration museum in Halifax.

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The Wheel of Conscience, designed by Daniel Libeskind.

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New memorial honours German-Jewish refugees who tried to enter Canada in 1939.

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Children are shown on the deck of the MS St. Louis in this undated handout photo.The Wheel of Conscience, designed by renowned architect Daniel Libeskind, will be unveiled Thursday at Pier 21, Canada's immigration museum in Halifax. The cylindrical steel sculpture memorializes Canada's shameful decision in 1939 to turn away a steamship carrying more than 900 Jewish refugees fleeing Nazi Germany. The luxury liner, MS St. Louis, was forced to sail back to Europe, where about 250 of its passengers later died in the Holocaust.

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The Voyage of the St. Louis (on The View From Here)Karliner children, clockwise from left: Walter, Herbert, Isle, Ruth.

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This is a 1939 photo of German Jewish refugees aboard the German liner Saint Louis. In 1939, before the outbreak of World War II, The St. Louis left Germany with 937 Jewish refugees aboard but its entry to Cuba and Florida was denied.The Associated Press

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The Voyage of the St. Louis (on The View From Here)Karliner family embarking on the St. Louis.

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