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Canada Native leader wants Saskatchewan premier to apologize for ‘60s Scoop

Robert Doucette was four months old when he was taken from his biological mother in Buffalo Narrows and placed with a foster family in Prince Albert.

Myron Kasprowicz/The Globe and Mail

The president of the Metis Nation of Saskatchewan, who was taken from his family as a baby and placed in a foster home, is calling on the province's premier to follow Manitoba in apologizing for the 60s Scoop, CKBI reports.

Robert Doucette was four months old when he was taken from his biological mother in Buffalo Narrows and placed with a foster family in Prince Albert.

He is among the latest political leaders in Saskatchewan asking for the premier to apologize for the government's handling of the events referred to as the 60s Scoop.

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An estimated 20,000 aboriginal children were taken by child-welfare agents starting in the 1960s and placed with non-aboriginal families.

Last week Manitoba Premier Greg Selinger apologized on behalf of his government.

Doucette says Premier Brad Wall and the Saskatchewan legislative assembly need to do right by First Nations and Metis people in the province and all apologize for the events that occurred during the 1960s.

"Yes, I know we just had the TRC (Truth and Reconciliation Commission), and I know people are tired of this, but you know Canadians and citizens need to know this did happen to people," Doucette said.

"It's a sad part of our history, people have to acknowledge this has happened and the best way to deal with this is to just say sorry."

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