Skip to main content

In this Jan. 27, 2016, file photo, an Aedes aegypti mosquito is photographed through a microscope at the Fiocruz institute in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil. The mosquito behind the Zika virus was found in Windsor last month.

Felipe Dana/AP

Health officials say there is no current risk of Zika transmission after mosquito larvae from a species linked to human cases of the virus were found in the Windsor, Ont., area.

Officials had enhanced their mosquito surveillance efforts after finding four Aedes albopictus mosquitos, a species capable of transmitting the virus, last month.

They collected larvae as part of that surveillance and three larvae grew into Aedus aegypti mosquitos, the species responsible for the majority of human cases of the virus in the Caribbean, South America and Florida.

Story continues below advertisement

All the mosquitos tested negative for Zika.

Local medical officer of health Dr. Gary Kirk says he believes it's the first time that type of mosquito has been found in Canada.

He says it's not clear how the larvae arrived, but eggs could have been carried over in shipping containers coming from the U.S.

Kirk says the Aeges aegypti will not survive the winter, but health officials will keep an eye out next year in case more arrive.

"Based on all we know about this mosquito, the absence of Zika virus in the tested mosquitos and in our community, we conclude that there has not been nor is there a current risk of local mosquito Zika virus transmission in Windsor-Essex County," he said.

Officials say the greatest risk to contracting Zika virus continues to be travelling to Zika-risk areas.

There has been one case of Zika virus in Windsor-Essex, but officials say that person contracted the virus through travel.

Story continues below advertisement

Report an error
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

If your comment doesn't appear immediately it has been sent to a member of our moderation team for review

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.