Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); }

Liberal Energy Minister Bob Chiarelli takes questions from the media following Ontario auditor general Jim McCarter's press conference at Queen's Park in Toronto about the cancellation of the Mississauga power plant, on Monday, April 15, 2013.

Matthew Sherwood/The Canadian Press

Ontario's Liberal government is changing the rules on green energy projects to give municipalities a greater say over the location of new wind and solar farms, and a chance to get a slice of the revenue.

Energy Minister Bob Chiarelli says developers of large energy projects will have to work with municipalities as part of a competitive process before they can ask for approval from the Ontario Power Authority.

He says developers that partner with a municipality will be given top priority for approval, while those that don't get local participation stand little chance of getting the go ahead.

Story continues below advertisement

Under the current feed-in-tariff program, developers can apply directly to the OPA, which led to many complaints from municipalities that had no say over new industrial wind turbines or solar farms set up in their community.

Chiarelli says the changes will give municipalities a much greater voice in the locating of large-scale energy projects, even though they won't get actual veto power.

Anger over large wind farms, especially in southwestern Ontario, cost the Liberals several seats in the 2011 election, when they were reduced to a minority government.

The FIT program for so-called "micro" and small green energy installations will remain in place, with priority points awarded to projects that are led by, or in partnership with the local municipality.

Chiarelli says the province is looking for another 900 megawatts from micro and smaller green energy projects over the next four years, and hopes to get participation from municipalities, universities, school boards, hospitals and industry.

The Energy Minister will formally announce the new feed-in-tariff rules later today in a speech to a solar energy conference in Niagara Falls.

On Wednesday, Chiarelli announced the province would move to eliminate another key part of its Green Energy Act, which required made-in-Ontario content in wind and solar projects.

Story continues below advertisement

The World Trade Organization ruled part of the legislation requiring electricity generators to source up to 60 per cent of their equipment in Ontario to qualify for generous subsidies contravened international trade law.

Ontario intends to comply with the WTO ruling, said Chiarelli, but is confident the province's manufacturing base for green energy components is strong enough now to survive without the regulation.

"The Ontario content provision five years ago was a lot more important than it is today," he said.

"In the last five years we've actually created an industry in the province of Ontario ... so it's not as big a factor. There will be a very viable industry moving forward."

Japan and the European Union had argued Ontario's incentives for green energy were illegal because they discriminated against foreign firms, a complaint that was upheld by a WTO adjudication panel last December. Canada appealed in February, but the WTO dismissed it in a decision released earlier this month.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies