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Canada Ottawa to offer summer jobs to eligible indigenous youth

“We are committed to ensuring that indigenous Canadians help shape the public service of the future because everyone benefits when the government is enriched by fresh perspectives and innovative ideas,” said President of the Treasury Board Scott Brison.

Adrian Wyld/THE CANADIAN PRESS

The federal government plans to offer summer jobs to 60 indigenous post-secondary students, building on a pilot program that began last year.

The program, which will have twice the openings this year as it did in 2016, offers the students up to 14 weeks of work in federal departments and agencies.

The Treasury Board says the project offers on-the-job learning, professional development and networking, as well as cultural events and mentorship opportunities for participants.

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It is part of an effort to attract more young indigenous people into the federal public service.

Eligible students can apply through the Public Service Commission's federal student work experience program.

The summer jobs will be in the Ottawa area, but students from across the country are eligible and financial support for travel and accommodation may be available for those living outside the capital region.

"We are committed to ensuring that indigenous Canadians help shape the public service of the future because everyone benefits when the government is enriched by fresh perspectives and innovative ideas," Treasury Board President Scott Brison said in a news release.

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